Finding Aid for The Bates College Oral History Collection | BCOH

Summary Information

Repository
Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library
Creator
Bates College, Lewiston Me.
Title
Bates College Oral History Collection
ID
BCOH
Date [inclusive]
1977-2011
Extent
142.0 interviews
Language
English
Abstract
The Bates College Oral History Project seeks to document and celebrate the rich and varied history of Bates College by compiling a collection of recorded spoken memories from a variety of individuals closely connected to Bates College, including alumni/alumnae, faculty, staff, presidents and students.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Bates College Oral History Collection, Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library, Bates College, Lewiston, ME, USA.

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Historical Note

Bates College is a coeducational, nonsectarian, residential college with special commitments to academic rigor and to assuring in all of its efforts the dignity of each individual and access to its programs and opportunities by qualified learners. Bates prizes both the inherent values of a demanding education and the profound usefulness of learning, teaching, and understanding.

Bates was founded in 1855, over 150 years ago, by people who believed strongly in freedom, civil rights, and the importance of a higher education for all who could benefit from it. Bates is devoted to undergraduate in the arts and science, and commitment to teaching excellence is central to the College’s mission. The College is recognized for its inclusive social character; there are no fraternities or sororities, and student organizations are open to all.

When founded in 1855, Bates was the first coeducational college in New England, admitting students without regard to race, religion, national origin, or sex. In the mid-19th Century, Oren B. Cheney, a Dartmouth graduate and minister of the Freewill Baptist denomination, conceived the idea of founding the Maine State Seminary in Lewiston. Within a few years the seminary became a college, and it was Cheney who obtained financial support from Benjamin E. Bates, the Boston manufacturer for whom the College was named.

Oren B. Cheney is now honored as the founder and first president of the College. He was followed in 1894 by George Colby Chase, who led the young institution through a period of growth in building, endowment, and academic recognition – a growth that continued from 1920 to 1944 under President Clifton Daggett Gray, and through 1966 under President Charles Franklin Phillips. Thomas Hedley Reynolds, the College’s fifth president, brought Bates national attention by developing a superior faculty and innovative academic programs. Donald West Harward retired in June 2002 after 13 years as president. On July 1, 2002, Elaine Tuttle Hansen, formerly provost at Haverford College, assumed office as the seventh president of Bates College.

Bates has limited its admissions and grown slowly, yet it also has pursued an ambitious program of building and equipment acquisition to support teaching. Dedicated in 1999, the 90,000-square-foot Pettengill Hall provides innovative teaching spaces, faculty office, laboratories, and other facilities for eleven social science departments and interdisciplinary programs.

In 2005, Bates College celebrated its Sesquicentennial, 150-years of history, excellence, and quality.

Collection Overview

The Bates College Oral History Project seeks to document and celebrate the rich and varied history of Bates College by compiling a collection of recorded spoken memories from a variety of individuals closely connected to Bates College, including alumni/alumnae, faculty, staff, presidents and students.

The personal stories and insights of interviewees of the Bates College Oral History Project offer a rich fabric of firsthand history spanning nine decades and provide a sense of the time and of the interactions between people who helped to shape the social, economic, educational and administrative history of the College. In addition, they augment and complement the extensive documentary material in the Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library.

The project includes interviews conducted by students and some staff and faculty members between 1977 and 1999, and interviews conducted by Oral Historian Andrea L'Hommedieu from 2005 through 2006, which coincided with the College's Sesquicentennial. Several other interviews were conducted by her in 2011.

Full transcripts of and select audio clips for many of the interviews can be viewed in alphabetical, chronological, or association (faculty, staff, etc.) order on the website at http://abacus.bates.edu/oralhistory/.

Administrative Information

Publication Information

 Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library

70 Campus Avenue
Lewiston, Maine, 04240
207-786-6354
muskie@bates.edu

Access Restrictions

Access to some interviews may be restricted. Contact staff for further information.

Copyright Notice

Requests for permission to reproduce and publish materials from this collection should be addressed in writing to the Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library.

Acquisitions Information

Recorded interviews and transcripts were given to Bates College and deposited in Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections following summer projects in 1997, 1998, and 1999 directed by the Dean of the College.

Processing Information

For the oral histories done between 1997 and 1999, biographical summaries and collection descriptions were written by Bates students. Final arrangement and description by Kurt Kuss, Special Collections Librarian.

Oral histories conducted between 2005 and 2006 were directed by Oral Historian Andrea L'Hommedieu. Katherine Stefko, then Director of Archives and Special Collections, served as Project advisor. The Website Designer was Erin Faulder, Class of 2008. The other student assistants on the project were: Charlie Hely, Class of 2007; Chris Nelson, Class of 2008; and Mutiara Stillman, Class of 2007.

Project website available

Audioclips and transcripts for many of the interviews are available online at http://abacus.bates.edu/oralhistory/

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Controlled Access Headings

Subject(s)

  • Bates College (Lewiston, Me.)--History

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Collection Inventory

 BCOH 099 Annett, John B. and Dorothy July 1, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

John (Jack) Annett was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Colgate University in 1939 with a major in political science and then entered graduate school at Syracuse, New York. In 1940, Mr. Annett married his wife Dorothy, an Oberlin graduate, and left graduate school at the beginning of World War II to work in Washington, DC for the Office of Price Administration. While in Washington he joined the Navy and served as a supply and disbursing officer aboard the USS Doyle. In 1946 Mr. Annett came to Bates to serve as assistant to President Charles Phillips; his chief responsibility was development. His wife Dorothy worked in Coram Library for a number of years. In 1969, Mr. Annett left Bates to return to graduate school at Syracuse and shortly after returning to Maine in 1972 began teaching history at Edward Little High School in Auburn.

Scope and Conents note

In this interview, Mr. and Mrs. Annett discuss: their association and friendship with Pres. Charles Phillips; their experiences living in Sampsonville; Mr. Annett’s responsibilities as assistant to the president; relations between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn communities; differences between President Phillips and President Reynolds; Mayoralty; Pops Concerts; student pranks; and Mrs. Annett’s experiences working in Coram library

 BCOH 100 Archambault, Phillip August 14, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Philip Archambault was born in Fort Kent, Maine in 1918, the youngest of nine children. At age seventeen he moved to Lewiston, Maine where he graduated from Lewiston High School in 1936. Mr. Archambault graduated from Bates College in 1940 with a B.S. in biology and went on to Tufts School of Medicine, graduating in 1943. From 1944-1946 he was a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps. Upon discharge from the service, Dr. Archambault returned to Lewiston and became a surgical resident at Central Maine General Hospital (now Central Maine Medical Center). He practiced general medicine for several years before limiting his practice to orthopedic surgery. At Central Maine Medical Center he served as chief of the medical-surgical staff and chief of orthopedic surgery. Dr. Archambault also, for a brief time, served as Associate College Physician at Bates College. He has been active in Bates affairs, serving as president of his class and on reunion committees.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. Archambault discusses several topics including: his experiences as a Bates student living off campus; reminiscences of chapel, Winter Carnival, and cabin parties; interactions and impressions of several faculty members and administrators including President Gray, Harry Rowe and Dr. William Sawyer; town gown relationship; changes at Bates from his student days and impressions of Bates today; his experiences in the U.S. Army Medical Corp and as the physician to the Bates athletics department.

 BCOH 141 Avram, Wesley May 1991   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Wesley Avram graduated with a B.S. degree from Northwestern University in 1981 and earned his M.Div. degree from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1984. He has studied at the University of Chicago and at the Interfaith Peace Academy in Jerusalem. Currently he is working on a PhD in rhetoric from Northwestern University. Avram came to Bates in 1990 as chaplain and lecturer in Religion and Rhetoric.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers the use of the chapel today; Avram’s first impression of the chapel and the differences between the chapel and other “regular” Protestant churches; comments on the chapel architecture as compared to other campus buildings and on the academic secular iconography found in the stained glass windows; importance of religion to education and scholarship; comments on baccalaureate services and the value of having a chapel and chapel program; also includes description and functionality of newer chapels on other college campuses; possible campus renovations and their effect on use of the chapel and ideas for renovations/changes for making chapel more amendable to religious gatherings

General note

The interview was conducted for Robert Branham’s short term course Documentary Video Production and footage was included in the student produced documentary film The Secular Cathedral: Bates College Chapel.

 BCOH 005 Bauer, Jim March 7, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Frederick Bauer was born in Greenfield, Massachusetts on May 20th, 1956. His father was a history teacher at Mt. Herman Preparatory School. The family later moved from Western Massachusetts to Worcester Massachusetts in the 1960’s. After graduation, he attended Babson College Business Management School. During his college years, he continued to foster an appreciation of computer programming, and was later hired by NERCOMP headquarters near Boston. He began work at Bates College in 1980 and continues in his role as Director of Network and Infrastructure Services..

Scope and Contents note

Mt. Herman Prep School; Dartmouth Computing Networks; NERCOMP; Evolution of computer technology at Bates College; President Harward; Relationship between the library and computer services.

 BCOH 129 Boyles, James August 10, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Boyles was born and grew up in Lemoyne, Pennsylvania. After graduating from high school he earned a B.S. degree from Pennsylvania State University. He spent two years teaching high school chemistry and physics in Chatham, New Jersey before coming to Bates to join the chemistry department in 1966. Professor Boyles served for many years as the advisor to pre-med students and eventually served as chairman of the medical studies committee. He retired in 1999.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Professor Boyles discusses his years at Bates including: changes in the chemistry department; differences in expectations of faculty under President Phillips and President Reynolds and the beginnings of scholarly research; impressions of Bates students and changes in the faculty/student relationship; changes in the campus environment including the abolishment of parietal hours and the introduction of co-ed dorms; the faculty/administrator relationship; changes in curriculum including interdisciplinary courses; reflections on the presidencies of President Reynolds and President Harward; relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; his involvement in technology and the beginnings of computing at Bates and the differences computing has made in teaching; impressions of Bates including the College’s strengths and weaknesses and his work advising pre-med students

 BCOH 014 Brown, Anne April 22, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Anne Brown was born in Portland, Maine on August 7, 1966. Her father was a history teacher at Cape Elizabeth High School and her mother was an English teacher at Catherine Macaulay High School. She attended Deering High School in Portland. Initially she did not look at Bates College as an option because of its location in Lewiston, but was convinced by her father, who took organ lessons from Marion Anderson, to apply. Anne Brown chose to be a chemistry major, because of her love of sciences and the individual attention from the department. She lettered in track all four years at Bates, and was captain her Junior and Senior years, class of 1989. After Bates, she attended medical School at the University of Vermont, and did her residency in New Orleans. She returned to Lewiston with her husband, an opthamologist, to practice medicine.

Scope and Contents note

Demographics of Portland in 1970s and 80s; academic record in High School; college search and application process; first days at Bates; relationship with advisor; running track; relationships with professors; social activities at Bates; Medical school and residency; changes in Lewiston between 1980s and present; shooting of Dean Carignan

 BCOH 010 Bruce, Marcus April 11, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Marcus Bruce was born on April 16, 1955, in San Antonio, Texas. He was adopted by the Bruce family and lived the first ten years of his life in Texas. His family then moved to Montgomery, Alabama, for two years and then to the Philippine Islands and eventually to Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Bruce attended Barnstable High School on Cape Cod and came to Bates College in 1973. Marcus was an athlete at Bates College and ran track. He also was involved with the Afro-American society on campus. Marcus was a religion major and went on to graduate school at Yale, where he attended the divinity school. He came back to Bates in 1987, and has been a faculty member in the religion department ever since.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; coming to Bates College; sense of community at Bates; social life on campus; influential teachers at Bates; graduate work at Yale; coming back to Bates as a professor; meeting Benjamin Mays.

 BCOH 040 Bubier, Stan November 21, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Stan Bubier was born in Lewiston, Maine on April 7, 1950. He grew up in Greene, Maine and attended Greene Central and then went on to Leavitt Institute in Turner for high school. He grew up on a dairy farm and continues to own race horses.

Richard Spaulding was born in Lewiston on July 15, 1945. He moved to nearby Lisbon when he was four years old. Spaulding’s father worked at Bates as an electrician and his mother worked at Bates as a maid. Richard Spaulding first came to Bates in the mid 60s and started working on the grounds. At the time, both of his parents were working at Bates as well.

Scope and Contents note

Working at Bates; physical plant personnel; student getting stuck on the roof story; pranks by students; various construction jobs around campus; notorious dorms; presidents of Bates; changes in relationships with students; Puddle stories.

 BCOH 054 Burke, James 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

James Burke was born in New York City and raised in Connecticut. He graduated from Bates in 1971 with a B.A. in history. He spent his junior year abroad at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. Burke earned his J.D. at Western New England School of Law in 1976 and has been practicing law in Lewiston, Maine since that time.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Burke’s role in the activist milieu, political activism at Bates, and characteristics of activists; relations between activists, faculty, and administration; Burke’s reflections on the campus response to the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy; the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War; Burke’s reflections on the College’s political involvement; College activists’ stance on Ed Muskie; description of Bates students of the 60s and drug use at the College; the significance of music on campus; gender roles and Burke’s reflections on the sixties as a national movement.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 101 Campbell , Harold (Harry) July 30, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Harold (Harry) Campbell was born in Hyde Park, Massachusetts and educated in Boston schools. He first worked for the Boston Post and then for the Guy Gannett Publishing Company. Mr. Campbell began work at Bates in January 1970 as an accountant in the business office. He retired in 1987.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Campbell discusses: his job responsibilities and duties; relationship with colleagues; interactions with faculty, staff and students; changes in technology and the growth of the campus and administration under President Reynolds.

 BCOH 055 Campbell, Leigh 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Leigh Campbell was born in Bath, Maine, on February 8, 1941 and grew up in Wiscasset, Maine. Leigh graduated from high school in Wiscasset and came to Bates College in 1960, where he majored in history. Dean Milt Lindholm was the major reason for his choosing to attend Bates over Bowdoin and Colby. Campbell was a teacher in public schools in Maine and New Hampshire before joining the Army in 1967. In 1973, Leigh came back to Bates and worked as the Director of Financial Aid, a position he has held ever since. Campbell is also an avid fan of the basketball teams at Bates. For many years he has served as the official scorekeeper for both the men’s and women’s teams.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Campbell’s observations and reflections on his personal experience at Bates College--his reasons for coming to Bates, his relationship to his roommates, particularly Robert Ahern, his experience as a proctor in Smith, favorite faculty members, and his relationship to Bates immediately after graduation; the social world of Bates College--the relationship between upperclassmen and lowerclassmen and between men and women, drinking, dancing, and music, the Sadie Hawkins dance, dating, the relationship between students and administration; football, basketball, baseball, and the music program; Bates’ educational plan in the early 1960s; admission of students from minority backgrounds; the level of civic engagement of the College, and the significance of national issues on campus--the Cuban Missile Crisis and President Kennedy’s assassination; the Vietnam War--the awareness of the war among students in the 1960s, the draft, Campbell’s service in Vietnam, and the meaning of the deaths of his friends.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 012 Campbell, Leigh April 15, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Leigh Campbell was born in Bath, Maine, on February 8, 1941 and grew up in Wiscasset, Maine. His parents were Harold and Priscilla Campbell. Leigh graduated from high school in Wiscasset and came to Bates College in 1960, where he majored in history. Dean Lindholm was the major reason for his choosing to attend Bates over Bowdoin and Colby. Campbell was a teacher in public schools in Maine and New Hampshire before joining the Army in 1967. In 1973, Leigh came back to Bates and worked as the Associate Director of Student Financial Services, a position he has held ever since. Campbell is also an avid fan of the basketball teams at Bates. For many years he has served as the official scorekeeper for both the men’s and women’s teams.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; coming to Bates; recollections of Dean Lindholm; impressions of Bates in 1960; influential professors; different rules; recollections of President Phillips; important political events while Campbell was at Bates; coming back to Bates; working at Bates; recollections about basketball.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Education course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 008 Carignan, Jim March 30, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Walter Carignan entered Bates College in 1957, graduating in 1961. Having grown up in Laconia, New Hampshire, he was the first in his family to go to college. Carignan taught at Kenyon College before returning to Bates in 1970. Jim began as Dean of Men, and later became Dean of the College. During his time at Bates he also taught History courses, and was elected to the Lewiston City Council, among many other activities.

Scope and Contents note

Influential professors at Bates; Memories of college; Coming back to Bates; Recollections of Hedley Reynolds; responsibilities of the Dean; Lewiston City Council; Bates’s relationship with the community; Norman Ross.

 BCOH 056 Carignan, James 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

James W. Carignan entered Bates College in 1957, graduating in 1961. Having grown up in Laconia, New Hampshire, he was the first in his family to go to college. Carignan taught at Kenyon College before returning to Bates in 1970. Jim began as Dean of Men, and later became Dean of the College. During his time at Bates he also taught History courses, and was elected to the Lewiston City Council, among many other activities.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Carignan’s reasons and reservations for coming to Bates College as a Dean; the social world of the College, 1960-1988: Carignan’s analysis of gender relations, students’ alcohol use, sex, and socializing off-campus; the relationship between students and the College’s administration, and changes in that relationship over time; campus political beliefs and the College’s mode of civic engagement; the college’s stance toward minority students and students from low income backgrounds; Bates’s educational program; mandatory chapel; the College’s identity over time; and Carignan’s vision for the College’s future.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 057 Carignan, Sally 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Sally Larson Carignan graduated from Bates in 1962 with a B.A. in history. While at Bates she had a leadership role in the Bates Outing Club and was a member of the History Club. She also dated and later married James Carignan ’61 who became Bates’ Dean of Men and then Dean of the College. Sally Carignan was involved with the civil rights movement at the University of Rochester and she teaches at Lewiston’s Adult Learning Center.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Carignan’s observations and reflections on the social world of campus during her years at Bates: gender relations, race relations, the regional composition of the student body, student/ administration relations, student/ faculty relations, recreation, contests over the meaning of being a woman and a sense of community; posture photos; pranks; compulsory chapel; the political world of campus: her political views, campus political climate, the administration’s response to drinking, and comparison to activism at other campuses in the 1960s; relations between the College and local community; and anti-Franco-American sentiment in Lewiston-Auburn.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 023 Carpenter, Bernie June 7, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Bernard Ridlon Carpenter was born in Westbrook, Maine in 1932. He grew up on a farm in Kezar Falls, Maine where his father was a laborer and his mother was a music teacher in surrounding towns. He attended Portland Junior College (now the University of Southern Maine) for one year, then attended Massachusetts College of Pharmacy for a year. He worked as a buyer for GE, and married Ruth Chapman and moved to Springvale. He earned a four-year degree at Nasson College in Springvale. He was the Bursar at Middlebury for six years, then accepted a job at Bates as Business Manager when his former colleague, Hedley Reynolds, became president of Bates. He later became Treasurer and remained in that position until retiring in 1998.

Scope and Contents note

Kezar Falls Community; Bernie’s parents; His work before college graduation; Attending Nasson while working; Working at Middlebury; Moving to Bates; First years at Bates under President Reynolds; Norm Ross; Harry Rowe; Working under President Phillips; Working under President Harward; Physical changes on campus; Building Ladd Library; Purchasing properties surrounding Bates College; Bates Forest; The Bernie Carpenter Fund; Iva Foster.

 BCOH 138 Cole, John May 11, 2011   1.0 digital recording(s)

Biographical note

John Cole was born October 9, 1941 in Worcester, Massachusetts. His family moved to Clayton, New York when he was two and a half and then to Syracuse, New York when he was eleven. John graduated from Deerfield Academy in 1959 and from Haverford College in 1963. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Harvard and came to Bates in 1967 to teach Cultural Heritage. After the Cultural Heritage course ended, Professor Cole began teaching in the history department where he specializes in the areas of ancient Greece and early modern France. He was named the Thomas Hedley Reynolds Professor of History in 1993 and has taught at Bates for 44 years.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Professor Cole discusses: his family background; experiences as an undergraduate and graduate student; changes in curriculum; growth of faculty including women; physical changes on campus; growth of the history department; committee work; recollections of President Thomas Hedley Reynolds; Cultural Heritage course.

 BCOH 079 Connors, Kenneth July 7, 1997   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Charles Kenneth Conner was born on December 4, 1903 in Auburn, Maine. After graduating from Edward Little High School he entered Bates College, graduating in 1925. Mr. Conner’s first career was managing movie theaters in Lewiston and Auburn and other towns in New England including the Empire theater in Lewiston from 1929-1964. He left the theater business in 1964 to become manager of the book and almanac department of Geiger Brothers, publishers of the Farmer’s Almanac. Mr. Conner remained at Geiger Brothers for 24 years, retiring in 1988. He has been past president and campaign chair of the United Fund, a trustee of Central Maine General Hospital (Central Maine Medical Center) and past president of the Auburn Public Library. He has also been active in Bates alumni affairs serving many years as the president and secretary of the class of 1925.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Conner discusses a number of topics: local schools he attended; teachers he had including those who were Bates graduates and classmates who also went on to Bates; his experiences and activities while at Bates including his involvement with the English 4A Players and the management of the movies at Chase Hall; anecdotes of several professors including William Hartshorn, A. Craig Baird, Grosvenor Robinson and Frank Tubbs; also discusses his interactions and long friendship with Harry W. Rowe; his experiences managing movie theaters in Lewiston and Auburn and New England; his work with the United Fund and for Ray Geiger at Geiger Brothers; his alumni activities including “irregular” class reunions and anecdotes of several distinguished classmates including Gladys Hasty Carroll, Erwin Canham, Dorothy Clarke Wilson, Meredith Burrill, Alice Swanson Esty and Euterpe Boukis Dukakis.

 BCOH 025 Coughlin, Dick June 13, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Richard F. “Dick” Coughlin was born on February 13, 1932 in Hartford, Connecticut. He grew up in East Hartford where his father was a production worker at Underwood Typewriter. He attended East Hartford High School, and graduated from Bates College in 1953. While at Bates he met his wife Norma (Crooks) Coughlin, who is class of 1952. He then joined the service where he served for two years at a radio school during the Korean Conflict. Dick and Norma then moved to Coventry, Connecticut, where they lived for twenty-five years, then moved to Somers, CT. Dick worked as a vice president of Aetna Life and Casualty. In 1991, they moved to Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Dick was a member of the Board of Trustees at Bates College from 1985-2002, serving on numerous committees

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Hartford, Connecticut; Deciding on Bates; Bates Campus; Memorable professors; Cultural Heritage; Bates Plan; Financial means of Bates students; Bates Football; Winter Carnival; Mayoralty; Lifelong friendships; Reunions; Being a Trustee; Sampsonville; Don Harward; Charles Phillips; Hedley Reynolds; Elaine Hansen; Milt Lindholm; Norm Ross.

 BCOH 007 Chute, Bob March 15, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert M. Chute was born February 13, 1926 in Naples, Maine. His father ran a summer hotel in Naples. After graduating from high school, Chute attended the University of Maine at Orono, majoring in Zoology. He later attended the John Hopkin’s School of Hygiene and Public Health. He taught in California, Vermont, and Pennsylvania before coming to Bates College, taking the position of head of the Biology department in 1962. He has also been actively writing poetry throughout his life. He retired in 1992.

Scope and Contents note

Living in Naples, Maine; Academic interests; Friends at Bates College; Personal experiences with poetry; Distribution of The Small Pond; Virginia Chute’s and Civil Rights; Collage artwork; The Vietnam War; The national organization of Veterans for Peace; Morse Mountain Conservation; Land issues; History of Morse Mountain Area; Scientific uses of Morse Mountain; Relationship with Bates College students; Changes within Bates College faculty and departments; The importance of Cultural Heritage; General Education requirements; Influence of women faculty members; President Phillips and faculty changes; Rare books; Marsden Hartley.

 BCOH 058 Chute, Robert and Virginia (Vicky) 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Robert M. Chute was born February 13, 1926 in Naples, Maine. His father ran a summer hotel in Naples. After graduating from high school, Chute attended the University of Maine at Orono, majoring in Zoology. He later attended the John Hopkin's School of Hygiene and Public Health. He taught in California, Vermont, and Pennsylvania before coming to Bates College, taking the position of head of the Biology department in 1962. Chute is an accomplished poet, and along with his wife Virginia, has been a strong activist for peace Virginia (Vicky) Chute was born in Portland, Maine and earned a BA and MA at the University of Maine. She is married to Robert Chute, Professor Emeritus of Biology at Bates College. Mrs. Chute has tutored college students in California and Pennsylvania and taught introductory philosophy at Bates College. She and her husband have edited and published "Plowshare," a peace newsletter and "The Small Pond," a literary magazine. Mrs. Chute has also written a novel, "The Remembrances of Marietta Lufford." In the summer of 1964 Virginia Chute spent several weeks in Mississippi as part of the Freedom Summer civil rights project, a massive effort that focused on voter registration drives and educating Mississippi students for social change. It was coordinated by the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) and included other organizations such as the SNCC, CORE, NAACP and SCLC. Shortly after Mrs. Chute returned to Maine the freedom school where she had taught burned to the ground. Some of the funds to rebuild the school were raised by the presentation of her play, "Set on Freedom."

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers the Chutes’ background; the political world of the campus in the 1960s including student response to the Civil Rights Movement, student, faculty, and community response to the Vietnam War, the campus fallout shelter, student involvement in campus and national politics, faculty deliberation, faculty and administration deliberation, the College’s response to national race problems, gender relations, and the liberal political shift of the campus over time; also covers the social world of the college including race relations and student/faculty relations; administration/student relations at Florida Memorial College; the Chutes’ involvement in state and national political and social issues including their response to national race problems, their involvement in the anti-war movement, their notes on race relations and liberal politics in Maine, and their reasons for involvement; also comments about President Philips and President Reynolds

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews.

 BCOH 102 Chute, Robert M. July 14, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert M. Chute was born February 13, 1926 in Naples, Maine. His father ran a summer hotel in Naples. After graduating from high school, Chute attended the University of Maine at Orono, majoring in Zoology. He later attended the John Hopkin's School of Hygiene and Public Health. He taught in California, Vermont, and Pennsylvania before coming to Bates College, taking the position of head of the Biology department in 1962. Professor Chute managed the Bates Morse Mountain Conservation Area for about 20 years. He is an accomplished poet, and along with his wife Virginia, has been a strong activist for peace. He retired in 1992

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Professor Chute discusses: his decision to come to Bates; the growth of the Biology department; Bates Morse Mountain Conservation Area; comparisons between Presidents Phillips, Reynolds and Harward; changes in the student body and student activism.

 BCOH 024 Costlow, Jane June 9, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jane Tussey Costlow was born in Morehead City, North Carolina on February 25, 1955. She grew up in Beaufort, North Carolina where her father was a marine biologist at Duke University. Her mother was a grade school teacher. She attended Duke for undergraduate study, and after two years of working as a translator, went to Yale for her graduate work starting in 1978. In 1985, she studied in the USSR for a year. She accepted an offer from Bates College in 1986, where she continues to teach Russian and Environmental Studies in 2005.

Scope and Contents note

Racial issues growing up in the south; Her parents; Studying French & Russian; Slavic Studies Department at Yale; Living in New Haven; Coming to Bates; Women faculty at Bates; Women’s Pot Luck; The Countryside in Russian Literature; Collapse of Russia; Language Departments splitting; Defacing of Sharon Kinsman’s door; Rostropovich at Bates; Comparison of Bates presidents.

 BCOH 004 Cowan, Mary March 3, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Erma Tetley Morton was born in Topsham, Maine, on February 4, 1910. Her daughter, Mary Morton Cowan, was born in Portland, Maine, on August 31, 1939. Both mother and daughter have lived in Maine throughout their lives and both attended Bates College, graduating respectively in 1929 and 1961. Erma’s father was also a Bates graduate, class of 1899, which led Erma to decide to go to Bates. Her grandson, Tim Cowan, was a fourth generation Bates graduate in the class of 1991. Both Erma and Mary majored in English, and they even had several of the same teachers. Mary has always had an interest in architecture, and has since designed several homes, as well as becoming an award winning children’s writer. Erma went on to become an English and Drama teacher. Both continue an active connection with the Bates community.

Scope and Contents note

Personal backgrounds; what led them to Bates College; influential teachers and figures from Bates College; generational differences at Bates; historical context; life after Bates; interesting stories from their time at Bates.

 BCOH 080 Cummins, L. Ross July 8, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

L. Ross Cummins was born in Essex County, New Jersey in 1919. He graduated from Yale University in 1941 with a B.S. in psychology and then began work on his master’s at the University of Connecticut. During this time, Mr. Ross worked as an intern psychologist at the state mental hospital. He entered the Army in 1942 as an enlisted psychologist and rose to the rank of lieutenant and chief clinical psychologist at Battey General Hospital in Rome, Georgia. In 1945 he was discharged from the Army to establish the Veterans Administration Guidance Center at Armstrong Junior College in Savannah, Georgia. Mr. Ross returned to Yale in 1949 to complete his master’s and doctorate in psychology. He joined the Bates faculty in 1952 and during his 37 years with the College, held the positions of professor and chairman of the department of education and psychology and director of guidance and placement. He and his wife Margaret lived in the Sampsonville housing complex for two years before moving to 32 Frye St. He has also traveled extensively.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Professor Cummins discusses: the department of Education and Psychology including the courses he taught, fieldwork options and other faculty members; the guidance and placement office which is now the Office of Career Services; his sabbatical experiences and travels abroad; and changes under President Phillips and President Reynolds.

 BCOH 016 Dalton, Chantal April 26, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Chantal Dalton was born on March 10th, 1948, in Newark, and raised there and Maplewood, New Jersey. She attended Bates College on a scholarship, graduating in the class of 1969. After Bates, she went to work for the admissions office at Wilson College of Pennsylvania. In 1970, she applied for the Ford Foundation National Fellowship, and attended graduate school at Northwestern University. She joined the Foreign Service within the Department of State 1981 traveling to many countries overseas as a diplomeat, a position she holds currently. She is married to Jorge Luis Garcez Rocha.

Scope and contents note

Newark, New Jersey in the 1960’s; Methodist upbringing; Neighborhood life in Newark; Applying to college; Bates College educational philosophy; Bates College and early signs of diversity; The Den; Bates College ties to Karachi Grammar School in Pakistan; African-American experiences on campus; The first ever Short Term; Differences between male and female privileges on campus; Dave Brubeck and the college choir; Professor John Tagliabue; Professor Robert Berkelman; Shakespeare and English at Bates College; Cultural Heritage; Professor Robert Chute; Scholarships at Bates College; The Vietnam War; Political feelings of Bates College students in the 1960’s; Using her English background in her work; The State Department.

 BCOH 081 Denison , Richard July 7, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Richard Denison was born and raised in Norway, Maine. He received his B.A. in English Literature from Bowdoin in 1976. After graduation, he spent two years working at the Carroll County Independent in Center Ossipee, New Hampshire. He came to Bates in 1979 as sports information director and writer-photographer for what was then the Bates New Bureau. Eventually his job evolved into that of general news writer and editor in the Office of College Relations. In October 1996 he left Bates to work for the Lewiston Sun-Journal.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Mr. Denison discusses the changes in the athletic program including the expansion of the coaching staff and a new emphasis on women’s sports; present and former Bates coaches; changes in NESCAC regulations; his duties as sports information director; technological advancements in news reporting; the merger of the News Bureau and Publications Office into the Office of College Relations and the development of WCBB; other topics include his recollections of President Reynolds, Edmund Muskie and Harry Rowe; the Dean Carignan shooting; the Chernobyl disaster and the Bates students who were in Russia at the time; visit of President Jimmy Carter and presidential candidate Michael Dukakis.

 BCOH 082 Derbyshire, Joseph July 17, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mr. Derbyshire was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He received both his B.A. and his M.A. in English Literature from the University of Utah, and his Master of Librarianship degree from the University of Washington. In 1964 Mr. Derbyshire was hired as acquisitions librarian at the Bowdoin College Library and eventually became head of the cataloging department. In 1974 he came to Bates as College Librarian and oversaw many changes in Ladd Library. He retired in 1994.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Derbyshire discusses various aspects of Ladd Library including acquisitions and circulation; the development of special collections and government documents; the reclassification of the library collection from the Dewey Decimal system to Library of Congress classification; the automation of the library catalog; the role of the library committee and library policies; and completion of the basement of Ladd; other topics include the acquisition and processing of the Edmund S. Muskie papers; contributions of President Reynolds; and Mr. Derbyshire’s interest in writing.

 BCOH 050 Fairfield, Roy July 13, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Roy Phillip Fairfield was born May 17, 1918 in Saco, Maine. His parents were Mary and Wilbur Fairfield. His mother was a successful laundress and his father was a mechanic. Roy is a historian, educator, and author. He graduated from Thornton Academy in and from Bates College in 1943. He received a doctorate from Harvard and has taught at Bates College (1947-1957), Ohio University, Athens College in Greece (Fulbright Professor), and Antioch University, where he was the first director of the Antioch-Putney Graduate School (in Vermont and Ohio). He is co-founder of the Union Graduate School in Cincinnati, a university without walls, and has served as chair of the American Council of the European Graduate School and as a faculty member of The Humanist Institute. He was also founding president of the Buckeye Trail, a 1,200-mile hiking and biking trail in Ohio, and is trustee emeritus of the Maine Appalachian Trail Club, which he had served as its second president. His published works range from poetry and Maine history to education research and fiction.

Scope and Contents note

How he chose Bates College; Alum, class of 1943; Professor 1947-1957; Cultch or Cultural Heritage; Perspective on Charles Phillips; Outing Club; Sampsonville; Professor salaries at Bates; John Donovan driving Ed Muskie; Methodist church; George Bush.

 BCOH 083 Farnsworth, Roy L. August 1, 1997   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Roy Farnsworth was born in Shirley, Massachusetts. After attending high school in Ayer, Massachusetts, he graduated from Boston University in 1949 with a B.A. in English language and literature. He spent two years with the Army Corps of Engineers in Heidelberg, Germany and also taught middle school English in Dayton, Massachusetts. In 1955, he returned to Boston University where he earned a master’s and Ph.D. in geology. Professor Farnsworth began teaching at Bates in 1961 and retired in 1990.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Professor Farnsworth discusses a variety of topics including the development of the Geology department; classes he taught including off campus short term courses; interactions with students and faculty; his sabbatical experiences; his work with the discipline committee and changes that occurred under President Phillips and President Reynolds including college policies and organizational structure.

 BCOH 009 Freeman, Elaine April 7, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Elaine Theresa (Hachey) Freeman was born on March 24, 1940 in Lewiston, Maine. Her father, Leo Hachey, was Franco-American and her mother, Margaret Hachey, was Irish. When Elaine graduated from high school, she went to work for the telephone company and then, in the 1967, began working at Bates College in the Maintenance Department as a secretary and later became assistant director, retiring in 2001.

Scope and Contents note

Lewiston, Maine community; Bates College changes and stories 1970s-1990s; jeep story; donkey story; clapper story; photo story; Maintenance department; pay equality; gender equality.

 BCOH 103 Freeman, Stanley and Madeleine July 27, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Stanley Leonard Freeman, Jr. was born in Brockton, Massachusetts and graduated from Howard High School in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts. After graduating from Bates College he went on to earn a Ph.D. from Columbia Teacher’s College. He served in the Navy during World War II and taught at the University of Maine in Orono from 1952-1991. He was vice-chancellor for academic affairs of the University of Maine system from 1970-1975 and served as acting chancellor in 1975. Madeleine (Richard) Freeman was born on February 10, 1926 in Allenstown, New Hampshire. She grew up in Pembroke, New Hampshire and graduated from Pembroke Academy. Madeleine graduated from Bates in 1947 and earned a master’s degree in adult education in 1981. She was the executive director of Eastern Area Agency on Aging for 11 years. Madeleine was involved with the founding of the Maine League of Women Voters and was the first woman elected to the town council of Orono. She was president of the Maine Municipal Association and a member of the Bates College Board of Trustees.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview the Freemans discuss: their decision to attend Bates; changes in campus culture due to the V-12 program and returning veterans; activities including debate and student government; impressions of President Gray and President Phillips; relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; various traditions and events including chapel, Winter Carnival, Mayoralty, tea dances, chaperones, final exams and fighting Maine forest fires in fall of 1947; reflections on their Bates education; faculty-student relationships; and changes at Bates.

 BCOH 041 Glazer, Frank December 13, 2005   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; Milwaukee; going to Berlin; family; Artur Schnabel; childhood piano teachers; musical progress; recollection of playing in high school; playing Carnegie Hall; studying the piano; composing; picking out a piano; appearing on TV; teaching; manuscripts.

Biographical note

Frank Glazer was born in the town of Chester, Wisconsin on February 19, 1915 to Lithuanian parents. He lived in Chester and then Fond du Lac, Wisconsin before finally settling in Milwaukee where he graduated from high school. Glazer grew up in a musically talented family and got started on the piano with the help of a sister who died when she was 14 years old. Inspired by his high school piano teacher, and assisted financially by two business men, Glazer set off to Berlin in October of 1932 to study the piano under Artur Schnabel. After stopping in Cleveland and New York City he arrived in Berlin. Leonard Shure, a former pupil of Schnabel helped Frank find a place to live. He moved in with the Kuertz’s. He began taking lessons with Schnabel and Shure. At the time Germany was in a state of political and financial turmoil. He considered studying composition in Berlin under the supervision of Arnold Schoenberg but was dissuaded by Shure. When the political situation became too dangerous for Schnabel, he decided to move to Lake Como in Italy. At that time Leonard Shure moved to Cambridge, Massachusettes. In 1933, Glazer left Berlin to continue studying with Schnabel on Lake Como. After four months, Schnabel was unsure of where he would be living. After contacting Shure, Glazer decided to move to Cambridge and take lessons from Shure. In Cambridge he also gave piano lessons, took lessons on counterpoint with Schoenberg, took courses at Harvard extension division, and studied Italian. When he was advised by his host mother that he may be doing to much he dropped the courses and the lessons with Schoenberg. In 1935, He traveled back to Lake Como to resume lessons with Schnabel. He once again took lessons there for four months. Frank Glazer has made a career that has revolved around playing the piano. Some of his accomplishments include playing Carnegie Hall, having his own television show, composing, playing with the Boston Symphony and artist in residency at colleges including Bennett and Bates College.

 BCOH 045 Glazer, Frank April 21, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Frank Glazer was born in the town of Chester, Wisconsin on February 19, 1915 to Lithuanian parents. He lived in Chester and then Fond du Lac, Wisconsin before finally settling in Milwaukee where he graduated from high school. Glazer grew up in a musically talented family and got started on the piano with the help of a sister who died when she was 14 years old. Inspired by his high school piano teacher, and assisted financially by two business men, Glazer set off to Berlin in October of 1932 to study the piano under Artur Schnabel. After stopping in Cleveland and New York City he arrived in Berlin. Leonard Shure, a former pupil of Schnabel helped Frank find a place to live. He moved in with the Kuertz’s. He began taking lessons with Schnabel and Shure. At the time Germany was in a state of political and financial turmoil. He considered studying composition in Berlin under the supervision of Arnold Schoenberg but was dissuaded by Shure. When the political situation became too dangerous for Schnabel, he decided to move to Lake Como in Italy. At that time Leonard Shure moved to Cambridge, Massachusettes. In 1933, Glazer left Berlin to continue studying with Schnabel on Lake Como. After four months, Schnabel was unsure of where he would be living. After contacting Shure, Glazer decided to move to Cambridge and take lessons from Shure. In Cambridge he also gave piano lessons, took lessons on counterpoint with Schoenberg, took courses at Harvard extension division, and studied Italian. When he was advised by his host mother that he may be doing to much he dropped the courses and the lessons with Schoenberg. In 1935, He traveled back to Lake Como to resume lessons with Schnabel. He once again took lessons there for four months. Frank Glazer has made a career that has revolved around playing the piano. Some of his accomplishments include playing Carnegie Hall, having his own television show, composing, playing with the Boston Symphony and artist in residency at colleges including Bennett and Bates College.

Scope and Contents note

Saying goodbye to family and friends; Leaving for Berlin; Stopping in Cleveland; Stopping in New York City; Reading about Leonard Shure; Schnabel putting Frank in touch with Shure; Crossing the Atlantic; First using German; Arriving at Schnabel’s residence; Finding a place to stay the first night; First lesson with Schnabel; Schnabel’s negative opinion of Frank’s heroes; Being a student of students of Leszetycki; Leonard Shure helping Frank find housing; Moving in with the Kuertz’s; Nazi’s gaining power; Being threatened by a Nazi; Poverty; Being approached by a prostitute; His host family; Being on a budget; Lessons with Schnabel; First playing for Schnabel; Shure and Schnabel’s eldest son Karl Urich; Studying with Leonard Shure; Schnabel’s inconsistencies; Complimenting Charles Colman; Hitler coming to power; Schnabel, Shure, and Glazer leaving Berlin; Deciding to move to Cambridge; Meeting with Schoenberg in Berlin; Schoenberg’s nervousness; Deciding not to study composition in Berlin; Meeting Shure in Cambridge; Studying counterpoint with Schoenberg in Cambridge.

 BCOH 047 Glazer, Frank May 23, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Frank Glazer was born in the town of Chester, Wisconsin on February 19, 1915 to Lithuanian parents. He lived in Chester and then Fond du Lac, Wisconsin before finally settling in Milwaukee where he graduated from high school. Glazer grew up in a musically talented family and got started on the piano with the help of a sister who died when she was 14 years old. Inspired by his high school piano teacher, and assisted financially by two business men, Glazer set off to Berlin in October of 1932 to study the piano under Artur Schnabel. After stopping in Cleveland and New York City he arrived in Berlin. Leonard Shure, a former pupil of Schnabel helped Frank find a place to live. He moved in with the Kuertz’s. He began taking lessons with Schnabel and Shure. At the time Germany was in a state of political and financial turmoil. He considered studying composition in Berlin under the supervision of Arnold Schoenberg but was dissuaded by Shure. When the political situation became too dangerous for Schnabel, he decided to move to Lake Como in Italy. At that time Leonard Shure moved to Cambridge, Massachusettes. In 1933, Glazer left Berlin to continue studying with Schnabel on Lake Como. After four months, Schnabel was unsure of where he would be living. After contacting Shure, Glazer decided to move to Cambridge and take lessons from Shure. In Cambridge he also gave piano lessons, took lessons on counterpoint with Schoenberg, took courses at Harvard extension division, and studied Italian. When he was advised by his host mother that he may be doing to much he dropped the courses and the lessons with Schoenberg. In 1935, He traveled back to Lake Como to resume lessons with Schnabel. He once again took lessons there for four months. Frank Glazer has made a career that has revolved around playing the piano. Some of his accomplishments include playing Carnegie Hall, having his own television show, composing, playing with the Boston Symphony and artist in residency at colleges including Bennett and Bates College.

Scope and Contents note

Traveling to Lake Como; Frank’s “worst lesson” with Schnabel; Schnabel’s impatience; Contradictory advice in lessons; Exploring caves around Lake Como; A trip across Lake Como; Schnabel as an athlete; Walks with Schnabel; Going to Cambridge; Traveling through Italy; Meeting Nicola Romeo; Studying Italian; Playing the organ; Aquiring and donating an incunabulae of Plavius Josephus; Varying opinions of Mussolini; Performing in Italy; Second trip around Italy; Friends in Italy; Hitler’s rise to power; Inflation; His sponsor’s prediction of the failure of communism; Taking courses at Harvard extension division; Avoiding a nervous breakdown; Performing in Cambridge; Al Capp; Hosting students; Experience with speech and languages; Speech lessons; Conlon Nancarrow manuscript; Seeing the Boston Symphony.

 BCOH 049 Glazer, Frank July 11, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

 BCOH 059 Gomes, Peter 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Peter Gomes graduated from Bates College in 1965 with a B.A. in history. After receiving an S.T.B. degree from Harvard in 1968 he was ordained to the Christian ministry by the First Baptist Church of Plymouth Massachusetts. He spent the next 2 years as an instructor in history and director of the Freshman Experimental Program at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Gomes arrived at Harvard’s Memorial Church in 1970 as the assistant minister. Since 1974 he has served as the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals and Minister in the Memorial Church. Gomes also has served on the Board of Trustees at Bates College since 1973.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Gomes’s observations and reflections on the social world of the College in the 1960s: friendliness, student body composition, race relations, dating, gender relations, the role of the Chase Hall Dance Committee, drinking, hazing; also includes reflections on campus political life: College’s involvement with the Civil Rights Movement and nuclear disarmament, politically engaged faculty and students, the campus bomb shelter, and the College’s emotional response to Kennedy’s assassination, the Cuban missile crisis, and the Vietnam War; also includes comments on compulsory chapel, his decision to attend Bates, Professor George Goldat and the Philips and Reynolds presidencies

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s. . Footage from the interview is also included in the student-produced documentary video, The Reynolds Years, created on the occasion of President Thomas Hedley Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 130 Grant, Prudence July 27, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Prudence Grant was born on May 25, 1942 in York, Maine and grew up in Scarborough, Maine. She majored in English at Bates, graduating in 1965, and received an M.A. in English in 1970 from the University of Maine, Orono. She has taught English at Lisbon High School for 33 years.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Ms. Grant discusses: her decision to attend Bates and her first impressions of the campus; freshmen activities including tea at the president’s house, shoe toss, bibs and hazing; dorm life and social life including women’s rules, dining facilities and the Sadie Hawkins dance; various courses including Cultural Heritage and anecdotes about several faculty members; her extracurricular activities including band and experiences participating in a community help day sponsored by the Campus Association; her decision to become a teacher and getting the position at Lisbon High School; and her thoughts on a liberal arts education.

 BCOH 072 Gremley, Florence May 1991   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Florence Pennell Gremley grew up in Auburn, Maine. She attended Bates College as a day student or “town girl” graduating in 1929. She participated in the town girls’ organization Lambda Alpha. For several years after graduation, she taught English at Edward Little High School until her 1932 marriage to Robert Gremley. She has been involved with numerous local organizations.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Gremley’s reflections surrounding compulsory chapel: chapel speakers, the role of compulsory Chapel in daily life, the religious and spiritual lives of students, and the chapel’s construction and architecture; Bates College’s role in the broader community, the relationship between “dorm girls” and “town girls”; and the relationship between men and women on campus.

General note

The interview was conducted for Robert Branham's short term course Documentary Video Production and footage was included in the student produced documentary film The Secular Cathedral: Bates College Chapel.

 BCOH 084 Griffiths, Arthur Aubust 1, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Arthur Griffiths was born in Waterville, Maine on December 21, 1928, the son of the Rev. Thomas M. and Esther F. Griffiths. He was educated in Waterville schools and graduated from Bates in 1950 with a B.A. in history and government. After graduation Mr. Griffiths taught school at Limington Academy and then worked as a broadcaster at radio and television stations in Waterville and Lewiston. In 1955 he became head of the News Bureau at Bates, remaining until 1974 and then pursued his interest in printing and publishing at Twin City Printery in Lewiston. In 1965, he founded the Monmouth Press, a typesetting and publishing company.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Griffiths recalls his years as a student and as head of the Bates News Bureau and discusses several topics including: his role disseminating campus events to the news media and his work on various Bates publications; his experiences photographing the Carnival Queen; his involvement with WRJR; the College’s participation in the GE College Bowl; anecdotes concerning Bates faculty members Karl Woodcock and Charles Sampson; and his interactions with President Charles Phillips.

 BCOH 085 Griffiths, Lois July 21, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Lois Griffiths was born in Hinckley, Maine. As a child, her family moved to Auburn, and later to Leeds, Maine. After graduating from Monmouth Academy in 1947, she enrolled at Bates and married her husband, Arthur, while both were still students at the College. After graduating from Bates in 1951 with a B.A. in history, Lois was a homemaker until her children were in school. For a number of years, beginning in 1967, she worked at the Bates library, first on a part-time basis and then full-time, doing interlibrary loan, working with government documents and assisting in the Reference Department. Shortly after the Edmund S. Muskie papers were donated to the College, Lois was asked to help organize them. In 1985 she became the technical coordinator of the Muskie Archives and remained in that position until retiring in 1995.

Scope and Contents note

Mrs. Griffiths discusses several topics including Sampsonville; Mayoralty campaigns, Winter Carnival and other social events; history courses that she took and professors she had; her experiences working in Coram Library and Ladd Library; the beginnings of Muskie Archives and the processing of the Muskie papers; also discusses her four children and their experiences as Bates students.

 BCOH 017 Haines, David April 28, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Born on January 30, 1942 in Lowellville, Ohio. Raised in Lowellville, attended Lowellville public school, majored in Mathematics at Worcester College, Ohio, attended Ohio State University for graduate school in Math, finished his Ph.D program while on the staff at Iowa State University but received his degree from Ohio State. Began working at Bates College in 1969.

Scope and Contents note

Early life and education; the hiring process at Bates; the changing administration; evolution of the math department; Bates self study; Changes in the student body; mission statement; finances and the budget; being mistaken for a student; the Stanton Bird Club and Thorncrag; Protests.

 BCOH 022 Handerhan, Larry May 27, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Larry Handerhan was born in Boston, MA on May 2, 1983 and raised in Wellesley, MA. He attended Wellesley High School. He started at Bates College in the fall of 2001, graduating in May, 2005. He was active in OUTFront and the College Democrats. Larry majored in History, focusing on twentieth century American history. He was the co-president of the class his senior year.

Scope and Contents note

Ethnic and socioeconomic diversity in Wellesley; Ethnic and socioeconomic diversity at Bates; Bates’ relationship with the surrounding community; September 11, 2001 and Bates’ response; OUTFront; College Democrats; Interest in and importance of Bates History; Sense of community at Bates; Being gay at Bates; Professors and courses; Rebecca Herzig; Elaine Tuttle Hansen and The Campaign for Bates.

 BCOH 042 Hansen, Elaine Tuttle March 23, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Elaine Tuttle Hansen was born in December of 1947 in Milford, Massachusetts. She moved with her family to Mendon, Massachusetts at age three. She went to public school in Mendon until seventh grade, then attended Nipmuc Regional High School. She graduated from Mount Holyoke in 1969. In 1972 she received her Master’s degree in English literature from the University of Minnesota, and her Doctorate in English Literature at the University of Washington in 1975. She served as associate editor of the Middle English Dictionary at the University of Michigan, then taught at Hamilton College. In 1980 she began teaching at Haverford College and became provost and chief academic officer in 1995. She accepted the offer to become President of Bates College in 2002.

Scope and Contents note

The Milford and Mendon communities; Early education; Mount Holyoke; Coming to Bates as president; Involvement at Bates; Bates compared to Haverford; Preceding presidents; Future challenges of Bates; Fundraising; Buildings; Diversity; Variety of tasks of the president; What people like about Bates; Balancing professional life and personal life; Time for reflection.

 BCOH 104 Harkins, David August 13, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

David Harkins was born in Lewiston, Maine on January 3, 1929, the youngest of twelve children. He graduated from Lewiston High School in 1948 and from Bates College in 1953. After graduating from the physical therapy program at Columbia University, Mr. Harkins worked as a physical therapist in New York and Rhode Island before returning to Maine in 1957 to start a physical therapy department at the Pineland Hospital and Training Center in Pownal, Maine. In 1964 he began the physical therapy department at St. Mary’s Regional Hospital in Lewiston and stayed for almost 23 years. He also did sports medicine work through a private practice.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Mr. Harkins discusses: his decision to come to Bates and the transition from high school to college; activities and events including football, Newman Club, Mayoralty, Thorncrag and chapel; relationship between faculty and students and between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; his career and how he became interested in physical therapy; and changes at Bates including the football and baseball programs.

 BCOh 060 Harrison, Webster 1984 or 1987   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Webster Harrison was born in Torrington, Connecticut on March 31, 1940. After graduating from Bates in 1963 with a major in biology, he was commissioned as an officer in the Marines. He served in Vietnam from 1965-1966. After his return he spent several years at Boston University coaching football. In 1974 Harrison returned to Bates as assistant football coach and assistant coach of men’s track. He serves as head coach of football and men’s lacrosse.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Harrison’s observations and reflections on Bates College during his time as a student and when he returned to Bates to coach: the social and political life of the College; College facilities; tuition; Harrison’s experience in the Marines and serving in Vietnam; his observations and reflections on public opinion about the military and the Vietnam War: his thoughts and emotions regarding protests and the draft and his home-coming reception; also mentions his thoughts about Bates football.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews.

 BCOH 105 Harrison, Webster July 23, 1998   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Webster Harrison was born in Torrington, Connecticut on March 31, 1940. After graduating from Bates in 1963 with a major in biology, he spent several years at Boston University coaching football. In 1974 Harrison returned to Bates as assistant football coach and assistant coach of men’s track. He served as head coach of football from 1978-90 and as head coach of men’s lacrosse from 1978-1993. In 1994 he left coaching to become the director of the Bates Parents Association, a position he held until his retirement in 1997.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Mr. Harrison discusses his move back to Maine from Massachusetts and being hired as the assistant football coach. He also discusses changes he has seen since his student days including dating, social life, diversity, curriculum, and traditions such as Bates songs, freshman week and mayoralty; also talks about the College’s egalitarian philosophy; his coaching experiences and the role of athletics in a Bates education; recruiting of athletes, including the lack of financial aid for them; and his involvement with the Bates Parent Association.

 BCOH 033 Harward, Don August 31, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Prior to the Bates presidency, Donald West Harward earned his Ph.D. in philosophy and published research in mathematics, analytical philosophy, epistemology and logic.

Through expanded academic programs and campus facilities, spirited efforts to reach out beyond Bates, and a near-constant encouragement to the Bates community to engage in the work of the College collaboratively and with civility, Harward helped Bates discover ways to translate a traditional culture of hard work, egalitarianism and social justice into greater excellence and national reputation.

"There are no spectator sports at Bates," he once said. "The College depends on participation and involvement." Bates created 22 significant new facilities and two dozen new academic programs during Harward's tenure. Through increased study-abroad programs, more support for student-faculty collaborations and a renowned service-learning program, students and faculty explored the world outside Bates.

"We reaffirmed the notion that learning carries a responsibility to the outside world," Harward said. The LA Excels collaboration established under Harward, called "the most extensive community development project in the history of the state" by then-Maine Gov. Angus King, inspired Bates and the community to recast their relationship and identify shared aspirations; upon his retirement, the Bates Board of Trustees endowed the Donald W. and Ann M. Harward Center for Community Partnerships.

 BCOH 106 Hatch, Robert July 21, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert Hatch was born in Boston, Massachusetts on November 16, 1924. He graduated from Melrose High School and enrolled at Boston University. He served in the U.S. Marines during World War II as a paratrooper in the South Pacific. Upon the completion of his military duties he returned to B.U. and graduated in 1949. He completed his master's degree in education at B.U. in 1955. Hatch came to Bates in 1949 as an instructor in physical education and freshman football coach. Hatch’s head coaching assignments included varsity baseball (1951-53) and football (1952-72) as well as golf. He became assistant director of athletics in 1959 and director in 1974 and was instrumental in bringing Title IX to Bates College long before it was mandated. He was inducted in the Melrose High School Sports Hall of Fame, the L and A Sports Hall of Fame as well as the State of Maine Sports Hall of Fame and the B.U. Sports Hall of Fame. Coach Hatch retired in 1991.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Coach Hatch discusses: his decision to come to Bates; his coaching experiences; administration support of athletics; student support of athletics; expansion of women’s sports including Title IX and its implementation; responsibilities as athletic director; changes in athletic facilities; issues involved in approval of new sports; perception of Bates and changes over time including growth of faculty, chapel, changes in curriculum requirements including physical education; local media coverage of Bates athletics and Bates’ involvement with the community.

 BCOH 013 Hayward, Tom April 18, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Thomas Ames “Tom” Hayward was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, on July 1, 1947. He grew up in the neighboring town of Westfield and graduated from Westfield High School. Tom majored in the Classics at Harvard, specifically Latin. He attended Rutgers Graduate School of Library Science. The following year, Hayward enlisted in the Air Force. He worked briefly in the library at the University of Maine at Orono before coming to Bates in 1976 as the Humanities reference librarian, and has held that position ever since. He has also taught in what is now the Department of Classical and Medieval Studies. An avid bird-watcher, he has been involved, along with his wife, with the Stanton Bird Club for many years.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; Harvard; graduate school; coming to Maine; coming to Bates; changes in the Ladd library; computer technology; role as a teacher at Bates; Classics department; Stanton Bird Club; changes in Lewiston.

 BCOH 001 Healy, George October 25, 2004   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

George Healy was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on May 31st, 1923. His father was an educator, later becoming principal of the high school that Healy himself attended. His mother was a teacher before marrying and becoming a full time homemaker for her two sons. He attended Oberlin College with a major in history, interrupted for three years to serve in the Air Force during WWII. He attended graduate school at the University of Minnesota, and later became an instructor at MIT. In 1957, he came to Bates College as an associate professor of Cultural Heritage. He later became Dean of Faculty under President Phillips.

Scope and Contents note

Bates College Cultural Heritage program; Bates College during the political 1960’s; Lewiston community and Bates College; Lewiston Politics; Dick Sampson; Milt Lindholm; Comparisons of Presidents Reynolds and Phillips; Influences of Bates on the student body; Edmund Muskie; Frank Coffin; Joe Corn student prank.

 BCOH 131 Healy, George July 30, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

George Healy was born on May 31, 1923 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He graduated from Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin High School in 1941 and served in the Army Air Force during World War II. In 1948 he graduated with honors from Oberlin College and received his M.A. (1951) and Ph.D (1955) from the University of Minnesota. After teaching at the University of Minnesota and MIT, Dr. Healy came to Bates in 1957 as associate professor of Cultural Heritage. He was named dean of the faculty in 1962 and held that position until 1971 when he left Bates to become vice president for Academic Affairs at the College of William and Mary.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. Healy discusses: how he came to Bates and his impressions of the campus and the College; description of Cultural Heritage program; faculty course load and expectations; changes in college life and curriculum during the 1960s; his dean of faculty appointment and responsibilities including the Junior Year Abroad program and the development of the short term program; comparison of the presidencies of Charles Phillips and Thomas Hedley Reynolds; relationship between faculty and administration and between students and faculty; reflections on several faculty and staff including Norm Ross, John Tagliabue and Toby Jackman; his thoughts on a liberal arts education and his decision to leave Bates.

 BCOH 028 Hiss, Bill June 20, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

William C. “Bill” Hiss was born on August 4, 1944 in Orange, NJ. He grew up in Mountain Lakes, NJ. His mother was a kindergarten teacher and his father was a businessman. He graduated in the Bates class of 1966. He then went to Harvard Divinity School. Before finishing he went to live in a parish in East Harlem and taught at a public middle school in Morrisania in the Bronx. He then went to Tufts for his Masters degree and his PhD. He returned to Bates in 1978 as Acting Dean of Admissions for a year by Hedley Reynolds, then became Dean of Admissions. During Harward’s presidency, Bill Hiss worked in external affairs. He now works in the office of President Hansen as Vice President of External and Alumni Affairs.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Mountain Lakes; His parents; College Search; Diversity at Bates; Graduate work and teaching; Returning to Bates as Dean of Admissions; Career changes at Bates; Lavinia Schaeffer; Little Theatre (now Schaeffer Theatre); Carl Straub; Faculty during the Phillips presidency; Studying Abroad; Social Life at Bates; Pranks; Sneaking out; Living off-campus; Girls signing out to Dunkin’ Donuts; College changes under Reynolds including women’s sports and faculty size; Stealing the Clapper out of Hathorn Bell; Blasting hymns the night before finals; Other small acts of rebellion; Oxford vs. Bates Debate.

 BCOH 032 Hiss, Bill August 9, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

William C. “Bill” Hiss was born on August 4, 1944 in Orange, New Jersey. He grew up in Mountain Lakes, NJ. His mother was a kindergarten teacher and his father was a businessman. He graduated from Bates, class of 1966. He then went to Harvard Divinity School. Before finishing he went to live in a parish in East Harlem and taught at a public middle school in Morrisania in the Bronx. He then went to Tufts for his Masters degree and his PhD. He returned to Bates in 1978 as Acting Dean of Admissions for a year, then became Dean of Admissions. During Harward’s presidency, Bill Hiss worked in external affairs. He now works in the office of President Hansen as Vice President of External and Alumni Affairs.

Scope and Cotents note

Experience with Prexy Phillips; Expanding recruiting base; Comparing Phillips to Hedley Reynolds; Don Harward’s presidency; Recollections of Don Harward; Red sneakers picture; Difference in styles between Harward and Reynolds; Elaine Tuttle Hansen’s Presidency; Development of the Master Plan; Story about Pat Pettengill; Ed & Edie Adams.

 BCOH 061 Hiss, William (Bill) 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

William C. “Bill” Hiss was born on August 4, 1944 in Orange, NJ. He grew up in Mountain Lakes, NJ. and graduated in the Bates class of 1966. He then went to Harvard Divinity School. Before finishing he went to live in a parish in East Harlem and taught at a public middle school in Morrisania in the Bronx. He then went to Tufts for his Masters degree and his PhD. He returned to Bates in 1978 as Acting Dean of Admissions and then became Dean of Admissions the following year.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Hiss’s observations and reflections on Bates College’s social world in the early 1960s and late 1980s including size and composition of student body, gay and straight student relations, recreation/social life, gender relations including Sadie Hawkins dance, egalitarianism, and the relationship between students and administration including pranks; also includes comments on expansion of curriculum and the faculty; the Vietnam War, political activism on campus; the emotional response of the nation to major events of the 1960s; college facilities; President T. Hedley Reynolds; relations between the College and Lewiston-Auburn; and growth of the Office of Career Services.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 48 Hochstadt, Steve June 5, 2006   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Elizabeth (Howard) Tobin was born on February 13, 1951 in Normal, Illinois. She lived in Normal, Bloomington, Peoria, and finally Des Plains while growing up. She attended Swarthmore College and graduated in the class of 1973. She then traveled Europe for a year and worked as an Au Pair in Germany to learn German. She returned to the United States and began her graduate studies at Princeton in 1974. After working on her degree at Princeton for two years she went again to Germany in 1976 where she met Steve Hochstadt and lived in Dusseldorf for a year and a half doing research. She and Steve came to Bates in the fall of 1979. They were hired on a joint appointment as Modern European History professors. She completed her dissertation in the fall of 1984, was the first Director of the Women’s Studies Department in 1991, and became division chair and later associate dean of faculty. She left Bates to become Dean of Faculty at Illinois College.

Stephen Lawrance Hochstadt was born on August 30, 1948 in New York City. He grew up in Carle Place in Nassau County, Long Island. He attended Brown University and after graduating moved to a suburb of Washington D.C. where he worked as a computer programmer for a couple of years. He returned to Brown for graduate school in the fall of 1973. He went to Germany in the summer of 1974, and again in 1976, where he met Liz. In addition to teaching at Bates, for the past twenty years he has recorded oral histories of Jews who lived in Shanghai during WWII. He has also been very involved with student discipline at Bates. He left Bates to move to Illinois with Liz, where he writes and researches.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up and family background; Undergraduate and graduate education; Grandparents in Shanghai (Steve); Interviewing at Bates; Development of the Bates History Department; Details of a joint appointment; Forming the mandatory History Short Term course; First years at Bates; Divestment in companies who did business with South Africa; March 4th discussions—Sharon Kinsman; Student Conduct Committee; Leaving Bates; Presidents and presidential styles; The formation of the Women’s Studies Department; Oral history as a research method.

 BCOH 002 Isaacson, Irving December 16, 2004   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Irving Isaacson was born on August 7, 1915, in Auburn Maine. Isaacson comes from a Jewish family that was originally from Lithuania. He grew up in the New Auburn area of Auburn, which had a diverse ethnic background. Isaacson chose to go to Bates College in 1932, graduating in the class of 1936. He studied under Brooks Quimby, the well-known debate coach at Bates College and was Edmund Muskie’s debating partner. Isaacson’s father, Peter Isaacson, was a lawyer in the firm Isaacson & Brann, where Irving practiced for his entire career.

Scope and Cotents note

Personal background; family background; time at Bates College; influence of Bates College; time spent on the debate team; influence of Brooks Quimby; memorable figures from Bates College; connection to Edmund Muskie.

 BCOH 132 Isaacson, Judith July 21, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Judith Magyar Isaacson was born in 1925 in Kaposvar, Hungary and was educated at the gymnasium in Kaposvar. She lived through four years of Nazi occupation. In 1944 she was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then taken to Lichtenau before being sent to Tekla, a camp near Leipzig, where she was liberated by the U.S. Army in April 1945. She met her husband, Irving Isaacson, shortly after her liberation and they settled in Lewiston, Maine, his hometown, in 1946. Mrs. Isaacson received a degree in mathematics from Bates College in 1965 and spent three years teaching math at Lewiston High School. She received a master’s degree from Bowdoin in 1969 and was hired as Dean of Women at Bates the same year. In 1975 she was appointed Dean of Students and retired in 1977. Mrs. Isaacson’s book, Seed of Sarah: Memoirs of a Survivor, was published in 1990.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Isaacson discusses her experiences as a nontraditional student at Bates and as an administrator: includes her admittance to Bates and courses she took; relationships with students and faculty; interactions with Professor Sampson, Professor Tagliabue, Milt Lindholm, Dean Carignan and President Reynolds; her teaching experiences at Lewiston High School; her acceptance into the master’s program at Bowdoin; her appointment and duties as Dean of Women including residential life, student conduct and academic counseling; abolishment of women’s rules and the changes in roles and rights of women; institution of coed dorms; minority students; Reynolds presidency; relationship between students and administration; issues surrounding her appointment as Dean of Students; and relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community.

 BCOH 107 Isaacson, Phillip July 28, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Philip Isaacson was born in Lewiston, Maine on June 16, 1924. He attended Lewiston primary schools. He spent his first two years of high school at Lewiston High School and his second two at Hebron Academy. He attended Bates College where he was a part of the V-12 Naval officer training program. He was in the Navy from the tail end of WWII until 1946. He returned to Bates and graduated in 1947 and then entered Harvard Law School where he concentrated on corporate law. He practiced law with his father for almost 25 years. He served on the Lewiston Board of Finance and as Corporation Counsel under Malenfant, Rancourt, and Beliveau. He was also the Assistant County Attorney. He is a senior partner in the Lewiston law firm of Isaacson and Raymond and is also an art critic, essayist and children’s book author.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Isaacson discusses his family and Bates connections; his experiences as a college student in the V-12 program and his perceptions of Bates and the faculty; the relationship between the College and Lewiston community; his past and present interactions with the College; and differences between President Gray, President Reynolds and President Harward.

 BCOH 108 James, John and Barbara July 12, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

John James was born in Auburn, Maine on March 10, 1921. He graduated from Edward Little High School in 1938 and from Bates College in 1942. He married Barbara Moore ’44 in 1943. After serving in the army he graduated from Boston University School of Medicine and upon completion of his internship and residency, Dr. James returned to Auburn to set up a practice in obstetrics and gynecology. He served as president of the medical staff at Central Maine General Hospital (Central Maine Medical Center), was on the staff of St. Mary’s Hospital (St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center) and served as the gynecology clinic physician for the Bates Health Services for 25 years. Dr. James retired in 1996.

Barbara Moore James was born June 8, 1922 in Arlington, Massachusetts. She graduated from Lewiston High School in 1940 and from Bates College in 1944. In the early years of her marriage she was a phlebotomist at the New England Baptist Hospital in Boston. Her father was Ernest “Monty” Moore, director of athletics at Bates College from 1938-1949.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. James discusses his family background and summer job driving a milk truck to earn money for college; experiences as a Bates student living at home; sports and activities, including chapel and Chase Hall dances; rules and regulations; meeting his wife; favorite professors including William Thomas, Frederick Pomeroy and William Sawyer; relationship between the College and the Lewiston-Auburn community; anecdotes about President Gray, President Philips, President Reynolds and President Harward and his work with Bates Health Services. Mrs. James discusses her early years in Lewiston, family background and Bates connections; Bates during WWII; and anecdotes about Bates alumni.

 BCOH 086 Jonitis, Peter July 29, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Peter Jonitis was born in West Fitchburg, Massachusetts on April 23, 1913. He received his undergraduate degree from Clark University and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Jonitis came to Bates in 1953 after spending time as a post-doctoral guest scholar at the Russian Research Center at Harvard. He taught sociology at Bates for fourteen years before becoming chair of the sociology department at Florida Southern College in 1968. He lives in Lewiston with his wife, Elizabeth and is a member of the Society of Friends.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Professor Jonitis discusses: the courses he taught including the first anthropology courses offered at Bates and another on race and cultural relations from a world perspective; his involvement with an American Friends Service Committee project in Chicago; travels to the Middle East with some American students; his experiences teaching at the Friends School in Ramallah, Jordan; his experiences in China while on a Fulbright scholarship; racism and feminism at Bates; student attitudes toward education and community service; his work as a state planner for mental retardation services for the State of Maine; also discusses his role as advisor to the sociology club and relations between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community.

 BCOH 077 Kay, Patricia Parsons June 14, 2009   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Linda Rolfe Raiss was born in Boston, Massachusetts on July 27, 1942 and grew up in Braintree, Massachusetts. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and lived in Wilson House, rooming with Patricia Parsons Kay. Linda spent her junior year abroad as an independent student studying at the Institute for Foreign Students in Aix-en-Provence. She graduated in 1964 with a B.A. in French and served with the Peace Corps in Tunisia. Linda has worked in the Braintree, Massachusetts planning office and is active in town affairs.

Esther Rosenthal Mechler was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on November 22, 1942 and grew up in Nashua, New Hampshire and northern New York. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and spent her junior year abroad in Geneva studying psychology with Jean Piaget. Esther received her B.A. degree in 1964 and her Master's and Sixth Year degrees in education from The University of Rochester. She began her career in education, but has been involved with the animal rights/animal welfare movement since the 1970s. In 1990, she founded SPAY/USA, a national referral service for low-cost spaying/neutering.

Patricia Parsons Kay was born on December 14, 1941 in Madison, Wisconsin. She attended Bates for one year (1960-1961) and then transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Patricia spent 1962-63 studying abroad with the University of Wisconsin-Madison's new junior year abroad program in Aix-en Provence, France. She roomed with her former Wilson House roommate, Linda Rolfe Raiss. Patricia graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1964 with a degree in history and French. She also earned her teaching certificate and eventually a master’s degree in library science. Patricia has taught school and been a librarian in Kenya and Australia as well as librarian at the Australian Embassy in Washington, DC.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Esther, Pat and Linda discuss: family backgrounds; decision to attend Bates; occupational opportunities for women; experiences at Bates including influential professors and courses, homework, social activities, women’s rules, seeing John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edmund Muskie in Lewiston before 1960 election; Junior Year Abroad experiences including application process, living accommodations, sightseeing and travels, classes, isolation and limited communication with families.

 BCOH 109 Kingsbury, Robert July 1, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert Kingsbury was born in Ithaca, N.Y. in 1912. After graduating from Bowdoin College in 1934, Kingsbury taught high school in Maine and New York before earning his master’s degree from Cornell. During World War II he taught at Bowdoin, Bates (in the V-12 program) and the University of Maine at Orono. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and taught physics at Trinity College for 14 years before joining the physics department at Bates in 1964. Dr. Kingsbury retired in 1978.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. Kingsbury discusses: his early teaching experiences and being hired at Bates; anecdotes and impressions of President Phillips and President Reynolds; short term; Bates social climate; development of the physics department, including expansion of faculty, changes in teaching style and courses; and hosting dinners for new faculty members.

 BCOH 035 Kinney, Bob September 12, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert “Bob” Kinney was born in Burnham, Maine on April 12, 1917. He was the son of Harry Edmund Kinney and Ethel Vose Kinney. The Kinneys moved to Pittsfield, Maine when Bob was five and lived on a farm. Bob attended high school at Maine Central Institute (MCI) and eventually got scholarship money so he could afford attending Bates College. Needing money to finish his education at Bates, he secured a job with the Libbey family, caring for their home and children. After Bates, Bob made his name in the seafood industry canning crabmeat with a UMaine professor, employing 400 people in the Bar Harbor area. When his company was bought by Gorton’s, and later Gorton’s was bought by General Mills, he became President and eventually CEO of General Mills. In later years, Bob became very involved as a Bates Trustee. He was Chairman of the Board of Trustees during most of Hedley Reynolds’s tenure as President of the college.

Scope and Content note

Family background; Growing up; Maine Central Institute; Coming to Bates; Working for the Libbey family; Harry Rowe; Frank Coffin; Edmund Muskie; Memorable professors; Pa Gould; Brooks Quimby; Gorton Seafood Company; General Mills; Becoming Chairman of the Board of Trustees at Bates; Recollections of Ed Muskie; Running the campaign; Guthrie Theatre.

 BCOH 034 Kirby, Verna August 31, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Verna (Louise) Brackett Kirby was born in Buckfield, Maine in 1913. She moved to several towns around New England, because of her father’s work, before finally settling in Canton, Massachusetts. Verna had several Bates relatives: her sister, Francis Brackett, 1933; her father, Vernon K. Brackett, 1912; husband , Vincent Kirby, 1933 and Verna herself, class of 1934. During her time at Bates, she encountered different rules pertaining to men and women. She majored in English and Latin, and lived in Milliken House during freshmen year and went on to be a proctor in Hacker House junior year. After Bates, Verna has stayed very involved in Alumni functions. She has served as a class agent for 57 years.

Scope and Contents note

Family background; choosing Bates; Gender issues and rules at Bates; Bates during the Depression; memorable professors; dances and parties at Bates; involvement with the alumni association; going off campus; recollections from scrapbook; minority quotas and rules: Sylvester Carter; involvement in the Outing Club; Ivy Day; appointment as proctor of Hacker House; Norm Ross; Winter Carnival; attending Chapel.

 BCOH 087 Kirk, Geneva June 27, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Geneva Kirk was born in Lewiston, Maine in 1917. She attended Lewiston High School and Bates College, graduating in the class of 1937 with a major in French. She began her graduate work at Bates and finished at University of Maine, Orono and New York Long Island, earning her master’s degree in Education. She worked as a teacher in the Norridgewock school system, then for the Central Maine Medical Center School of Nursing for two years. She worked in the Augusta school system for four or five years, then taught in Lewiston from 1948-1979. She was president of the Lewiston Teachers Association, member of the Maine Teachers Association, on the Board of the Technical College System and the Board of the University College System and on the Maine State Museum Commission. She worked with United Way for 20 years. She has been president of the Maine Retired Teachers’ Association.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Miss Kirk talks about her student years at Bates during the Depression including her experiences being a town girl; social life; serving as an assistant in the French Department; interactions with the area churches; and student teaching. Other topics include relations between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; interactions with Bates presidents, faculty and students. Also discusses her volunteer work with many organizations including the local Bates alumni association and volunteer projects they did for the college; the United Way and the First Call office; Red Cross; church work; the Board of Trustees at University of Maine and the Board of the Technical College System.

 BCOH 088 Lalonde, Daniel R. August 8, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mr. Lalonde is a Lewiston native. After graduating from Lewiston High School he spent four years in the Marine Corp. Upon discharge, he began working for the Lewiston Fire Department eventually attaining the rank of deputy fire chief. Retiring in 1987 after 28 years with the fire department, he was hired by Bates College as its first life safety technician. He retired in 1997.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Mr. Lalonde discusses his experiences dealing with various safety issues on the Bates campus and his involvement with administrators, faculty, staff and students in making policy changes. Includes discussion of various training programs; Bates’ participation in the OSHA 200 Local Emphasis Program; policy issues concerning lofts, open-flames and building occupancy loads; and campus fires in Parker Hall, President’s House and Wilson House.

 BCOH 018 Lattanzi, Kathryn April 28, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mary Kathryn Lattanzi was born on November 15, 1954 in Chicago. She attended high school at the Convent of the Sacred Heart, where she became interested in art. She majored in Art History in college in Boston, and went on to work for the exhibition design team at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. She later moved to Maine with her husband and started working for the Maine Maritime Museum. In 1981 she came to Bates College as the curator of the Art Museum. She was instrumental in the planning process for the construction of the Olin Arts Center.

Scope and Contents note

Educational background; Treat Gallery; Planning and construction of the Olin Arts Center; Muskie Archives opening; Future needs of the art department; Relationships with L.A. Arts and L.A. College.

 BCOH 110 Leahey, William July 17, 1998   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

William “Chick” Leahey was born in Lewiston, Maine on August 15, 1925. Following his graduation from Lewiston High School, where he was an outstanding student-athlete, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After his discharge from the Marines, he played in the New York Yankee baseball organization for several years. He entered Bates in the fall of 1948, where, because of his affiliation with professional baseball, he was ineligible to participate on varsity teams. He did, however, work as an assistant coach of successful Bates freshman football and baseball squads. Chick graduated from Bates in 1952 with a degree in economics and earned his master’s degree in physical education from Columbia. He returned to Bates in 1955 as head baseball, assistant football and freshman basketball coach. Coach Leahey retired in 1990 after coaching baseball for 36 years, football for 33 years and freshman basketball for 20 years.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Coach Leahey discusses: his decisions to play professional baseball, to attend Bates and to return as a teacher and coach; the role of athletics at Bates; changes in the athletic program including facilities and equipment; teaching physical education classes and changes in course requirements; coaching during the 1960s; memorable events in his coaching career; outstanding student athletes; his involvement with the New England College Baseball Association and his role in helping to eliminate tobacco chewing in college baseball; relationship between coaches and students; lack of reporting about Bates sports in local newspaper; and his retirement activities.

 BCOH 019 Leamon, Jim May 2, 2005   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Shenstone “Jim” Leamon was born on December 9, 1930 in Melrose, MA. Raised in Melrose and Cambridge Massachusetts, he attended Melrose, Cambridge, Shady Hill School, and Belmont High School. His father was a minister at Harvard. He attended Bates for one and a half years, joined the Navy for two years, then returned to Bates and graduated in 1955. Received his Ph.D. in History from Brown, and began teaching at Bates in 1964, retiring in 2000.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Cambridge, Massachusetts; WWII family experiences; High School Education; Visiting Bates; Bates atmosphere; Descriptions of many professors; Joining the Navy; Atmosphere at Bates, final two years; Mayoralty Campaigns; Professorship at Bates ’64-on; Changing rules; Donkey Prank; President Reynolds; Faculty greeting freshmen story; George Fetter; Norm Ross-pencil sharpener story.

 BCOH 074 Leamon, James May 1991   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

James Leamon was born on December 9, 1930 in Melrose, MA. Raised in Melrose and Cambridge Massachusetts, he attended Melrose, Cambridge, Shady Hill School, and Belmont High School. His father was a minister at Harvard. He attended Bates for one and a half years, joined the Navy for two years, then returned to Bates and graduated in 1955. He received his Ph.D. in History from Brown University, and began teaching at Bates in 1964.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Leamon’s interpretation of the history of the educational program at Bates College: the founders’ intentions, student, faculty, and administration conflicts over the program in the 1950s, the secularization of the program, and the place of the chapel in this history; the organization of compulsory chapel in the 1950s: schedule, attendance, and speakers; programs that developed cohesion in the student body: the Cultural Heritage requirement, Mayorality, and hazing; marriages in the chapel; and the social role of religion for students.

General note

The interview was conducted for Robert Branham’s short term course Documentary Video Production and footage was included in the student produced documentary film The Secular Cathedral: Bates College Chapel.

 BCOH 062 Leamon, James 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

James Leamon was born on December 9, 1930 in Melrose, MA. Raised in Melrose and Cambridge Massachusetts, he attended Melrose, Cambridge, Shady Hill School, and Belmont High School. His father was a minister at Harvard. He attended Bates for one and a half years, joined the Navy for two years, then returned to Bates and graduated in 1955. He received his Ph.D. in History from Brown University, and began teaching at Bates in 1964.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers students’ political world: changes in political orientations between the 1950s and 1960s, and organized political action; relations between students, faculty, and administration; faculty response to the Vietnam War; the impact of Hedley Reynolds’ presidency on the College; the end of the Cultural Heritage course sequence: reasons for its removal from the curriculum and absences it left; changing gender norms; and Mayorality

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s. Footage from the interview is also included in the student-produced documentary video, The Reynolds Years, created on the occasion of President Thomas Hedley Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 111 Letendre, Benoit N. and Jacqueline B. August 28, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jacqueline (Boucher) Letendre was born October 21, 1923 in Lewiston, Maine. She graduated from Lewiston High School in 1941 and worked for 11 years before entering Bates College. After graduating in 1956 with a degree in sociology, she attended Bryn Mawr graduate school and then transferred to Simmons, where she earned her master’s degree in social work in 1958. After her father died, she moved back to Maine and worked for both St. Mary’s Hospital and the State of Maine.

Benoit Letendre was born in Lewiston, Maine on November 20, 1931. He graduated from Lewiston High School in 1950 and from Bates College in 1954 with a degree in French. After graduation he served in the Army and worked in the insurance industry before becoming a social worker in the adult protective services for the Maine Department of Human Services. Benoit and Jacquelyn were married in 1974 and retired in 1991.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview the Letendre’s discuss: their Franco-American backgrounds and experiences growing up in Lewiston; their decision to attend Bates; their student experiences including, off-campus living, freshman activities; curriculum requirements, chapel; the town girls room in Hathorn; changes in the relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; and memorable professors including John Willis, Anders Myhrman and James Miller.

 BCOH 112 Lindholm, Jane Ault   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jane Ault Lindholm was born September 1, 1915 in Ellsworth, Maine and moved to Auburn, Maine soon after. She attended Wheaton College in Massachusetts before transferring to Bates where she graduated in the class of 1937. The following year she married Milton Lindholm ‘36 and together they moved to Massachusetts where they resided until 1944 when Bates offered Mr. Lindholm the position of Director of Admissions for Men. Mrs. Lindholm has been active in the Bates community and has worked for several college departments including the Registrar’s Office and the Office of Alumni Affairs.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Lindholm discusses various topics concerning her student days at Bates and as a faculty spouse. Topics include: experiences of local students living at home; interactions between the students and the community; the social scene; anecdotes about several faculty members and administrators including Professors Berkelman, Fischer, Whitbeck, Knapp, Robinson, and Myhrman as well as Harry Rowe, Dean Hazel Clark, Mabel Libby and Mabel Eaton; anecdotes about several black students; the roles and expectations of faculty spouses; reflections on Presidents Gray, Phillips and Reynolds; her experiences working in the Registrar’s Office and the Alumni Office and changes in the faculty and student body.

 BCOH 133 Lindholm, Milton June 25, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Milton Lambert Lindholm was born on June 3, 1911 in Collinsville, Connecticut. When he was a year old his clergyman father died and he and his mother moved to Waltham, MA to live with her family. After graduating from Waltham High School in 1929, Milt worked for a couple of years before entering Bates College in the fall of 1931. After his graduation in 1935, he spent two years as a teacher and coach at the Maine Central Institute and then worked for the World Book Company in Boston for seven years. In the fall of 1945 he returned to Bates to become the Director of Admissions for Men. He was named Dean of Admissions in 1960 and held that position until his retirement in 1976.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Lindholm discusses: his admission to Bates by Harry Rowe; his activities and experiences as a student including football, dorm life, chapel, minority students, campus jobs, classes and professors including Brooks Quimby, Raymond (Pa) Gould, Oliver Cutts, Dave Morey and George Millet Chase; the relationship between students and the administration and the relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; also discusses his experiences at Maine Central Institute; his return to Bates and early experiences in admitting students; admission qualifications, quotas, and growth of the admissions office; and reflections on Presidents Gray, Phillips and Reynolds

 BCOH 031 Lindholm, Milt and Jane July 25, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Milton Lambert Lindholm was born on June 3, 1911 in Collinsville, Connecticut. His father, who was a clergyman, died when he was one year old and he moved in with his mother’s parents in Waltham, Massachusetts. Between high school graduation in 1929 and entering Bates in 1931, he worked for a couple years. He graduated in the Bates class of 1935, then taught and coached at MCI (Maine Central Institute) for 2 years. He worked for the World Book Company in Boston for seven years, before returning to Bates in the fall of 1945 to become the Director of Admissions for Men; he became “Dean of Admissions” (including both men and women) in 1960, serving until 1976.

Jane Ault Lindholm was born September 1, 1915 in Ellsworth, Maine and moved to Auburn, Maine soon after. Her father, Charles Ault, owned a shoe business; her mother died when Jane was five. Her father lost his business in the early 30s while she was attending Wheaton College, so she transferred to Bates in 1933 and graduated in the class of 1937, while living at home and helping with her eight brothers and sisters. She and Milt met her sophomore year and they were later married by Professor Zerby. Jane worked part-time in the Registrar’s office at one time.

Scope and Contents note

Jane and Milt’s childhoods; Milt’s jobs after high school; Harry Rowe; Stories of how they both came to attend Bates; Rebuilding male enrollment; Admissions department; Charles Sampson and Sampsonville; Charles Phillips; Norm Ross; Frugal administration; George Lane story; Rules for women; Library; Professors at Bates; Closeness of faculty; Lewiston movie theaters; How Milt and Jane met; Lavinia Schaeffer; Football games; Reflections on presidents of Bates and their styles.

 BCOH 063 Litchfield, Lynda 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Lynda Litchfield attended Bates from 1967 to 1971.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Litchfield’s reflections on memory: faithfulness to facts, changes in the meaning of a period in history over time—particularly the sixties; the social world of the College: Litchfield’s observations and reflections on students’ relation to youth culture and the hippie movement, gender relations, space for sexual intimacy, socializing, College traditions, and campus drug use; the political world of campus: campus activists’ response to invasion of Cambodia, activists’ work for women’s rights issues on campus, and faculty’s civil rights work.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 011 Marden, Judith April 12, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Judith Marden was born on November 17, 1944 in Boston, Massachusetts. Her father, George Fred Marden, was an electrical engineer, and her mother, Lucy Chittick Marden, was a teacher. Judith entered Bates College in 1962, where she majored in English and was very active in the Outing Club. In 1966 she graduated from Bates and went on to Boston University to attend the School of Public Communications and Journalism. Judith came back to Maine and worked as a teacher at Kent’s Hill for two years. Her first job at Bates College was working in the newly formed development office. At Bates, she has also been business manager, the first Director of Special Projects and the first Director of Personnel. She also worked with former college president Hedley Reynolds for many years. She played a major role in developing such things as the summer program at Bates and a student led employment office, and continues to be involved with maintaining the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; coming to Bates College; influential teachers at Bates; working at Kent’s Hill; working in the development office; developing the special projects and summer programs; Personnel Department (forerunner to Human Resources); involvement with the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area; Hedley Reynolds; student employment office.

 BCOH 039 Marden, Judith November 14, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Judith Marden was born on November 17, 1944 in Boston, Massachusetts. Her father, George Fred Marden, was an electrical engineer, and her mother, Lucy Chittick Marden, was a teacher. Judith entered Bates College in 1962, where she majored in English and was very active in the Outing Club. In 1966 she graduated from Bates and went on to Boston University to attend the School of Public Communications and Journalism. Judith came back to Maine and worked as a teacher at Kent’s Hill for two years. Her first job at Bates College was working in the newly formed development office. At Bates, she has also been business manager, the first Director of Special Projects and the first Director of Personnel. She also worked with former college president Hedley Reynolds for many years. She played a major role in developing such things as the summer program at Bates and a student led employment office, and continues to be involved with maintaining the Bates-Morse Mountain Conservation Area.

Scope and Contents note

Gardens at Bates; history of the Outing Club; Dick and Jean Sampson; recollections from the Outing Club; building a lean-to for the Outing Club; Popham Beach; support staff at Bates; improvements at Bates.

 BCOH 113 Marcus, Bernard August 14, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Bernard Marcus was born on April 4, 1914 in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. In 1933 he graduated from Cushing Academy in Ashburnham, Massachusetts and entered Bates College where he became a three-sport star athlete. After graduating in 1937 with a B.S. in biology, Marcus entered Harvard Dental School, graduating in 1942. Dr. Marcus served in the U.S. Navy during World War II as a shipboard dentist. Returning to Maine after the war he established a dental practice in Auburn. Dr. Marcus retired in 1985. He was inducted into the Lewiston-Auburn Sports Hall of Fame in 1992.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. Marcus discusses: his decision to attend Bates; experiences during his student years; athletics and Coach Dave Morey; his family and the establishment of his dental practice.

 BCOH 067 Matthews, William circa 1989   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

William Matthews is a composer and conductor who studied at Oberlin College, the University of Iowa, Yale University, and the Institute of Sonology in the Netherlands. A recipient of several national awards and commissions, he is particularly interested in electronic and computer-generated music, and in American music of all types. Matthews began teaching at Bates in 1978. He teaches composition along with courses in jazz and popular music

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Matthews’ reflections on the impact of Reynolds’ presidency on the arts at Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; describes the arts prior to Reynolds’ arrival and the arts community now including the Olin Arts Center’s facilities; his relationship with President Reynolds including his position as composer; also comments on the two commissioned pieces he composed on behalf of Reynolds—for the opening of the Olin Arts Center and on the occasion of President Reynolds retirement

General note

The interview was conducted by Anthony Nguyen ‘89 and Melissa Friedling ’91 to document the presidency of Thomas Hedley Reynolds. Footage was included in the documentary video, "The Reynolds Years,” produced by the students and supervised by Professor Robert Branham, on the occasion of Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 077 Mechler, Esther Rosenthal June 14, 2009   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Linda Rolfe Raiss was born in Boston, Massachusetts on July 27, 1942 and grew up in Braintree, Massachusetts. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and lived in Wilson House, rooming with Patricia Parsons Kay. Linda spent her junior year abroad as an independent student studying at the Institute for Foreign Students in Aix-en-Provence. She graduated in 1964 with a B.A. in French and served with the Peace Corps in Tunisia. Linda has worked in the Braintree, Massachusetts planning office and is active in town affairs.

Esther Rosenthal Mechler was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on November 22, 1942 and grew up in Nashua, New Hampshire and northern New York. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and spent her junior year abroad in Geneva studying psychology with Jean Piaget. Esther received her B.A. degree in 1964 and her Master's and Sixth Year degrees in education from The University of Rochester. She began her career in education, but has been involved with the animal rights/animal welfare movement since the 1970s. In 1990, she founded SPAY/USA, a national referral service for low-cost spaying/neutering.

Patricia Parsons Kay was born on December 14, 1941 in Madison, Wisconsin. She attended Bates for one year (1960-1961) and then transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Patricia spent 1962-63 studying abroad with the University of Wisconsin-Madison's new junior year abroad program in Aix-en Provence, France. She roomed with her former Wilson House roommate, Linda Rolfe Raiss. Patricia graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1964 with a degree in history and French. She also earned her teaching certificate and eventually a master’s degree in library science. Patricia has taught school and been a librarian in Kenya and Australia as well as librarian at the Australian Embassy in Washington, DC.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Esther, Pat and Linda discuss: family backgrounds; decision to attend Bates; occupational opportunities for women; experiences at Bates including influential professors and courses, homework, social activities, women’s rules, seeing John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edmund Muskie in Lewiston before 1960 election; Junior Year Abroad experiences including application process, living accommodations, sightseeing and travels, classes, isolation and limited communication with families.

 BCOH 089 McCann, A. Lucille August 7, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mrs. McCann was born in Metcalf, Georgia in 1919, and grew up there. She graduated from Thomasville High School (Georgia) in 1937, and subsequently attended Georgia State College for Women for one year. After marrying, she and her husband and family eventually moved to Maine. In 1968 she began working at the Bates College Bookstore and helping in the post office. She retired from that position in 1982.

Scope and Contents note

Interview discusses her experiences working at the Bates Bookstore including its management; the supplies and services offered; staff changes and the building of the new bookstore; also discusses interactions with students, faculty and staff.

 BCOH 015 McCann, Dervilla April 26, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Dervilla Maureen McCann was born in 1955 in New York City. Shortly after she was born, her family moved to New Foundland, Canada, where they had originally emigrated to from Ireland. Dervilla is the daughter of two physicians. After a stay in New Foundland, the McCann family moved to New Hampshire before settling in Barrington, Rhode Island. She attended Bates College graduating in the class of 1977. She became very involved with the dance program while at Bates. After Bates, Dervilla went on to medical school. She now works as a Cardiologist at Androscoggin Cardiology.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; coming to Bates; drug scene at Bates; getting involved with the dance program; problems with facilities for Bates dancers; working in Lewiston as a waitress; influential professors; lack of political activity on campus; transformation of the Androscoggin; ethnic relations among the students.

 BCOH 114 McKusick, Vincent August 4, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Vincent Lee McKusick was born October 21, 1921 in Parkman, Maine on the family dairy farm. His education included attending a one-room school house, Guilford High School, Bates College (class of 1944), MIT (engineering 1947) and Harvard Law School (1950), where he was president of the Harvard Law Review. He joined the U.S. Army in 1943, and was part of a research group for the Manhattan Project. He has been a member of the Pierce-Atwood law firm since 1952, and was Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court from 1977 to 1992. He also served on Bates College’s Board of Trustees for many years.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. McKusick discusses: family background and his decision to attend Bates; the College during the early 40’s; his activities including debate; Brooks Quimby; social life; Lewiston during the 40’s; minority students; impressions of Presidents Gray, Phillips, Reynolds and Harward; J. Murray Carroll; Norm Ross; Harry Rowe; Bates Board of Trustees; and changes at Bates.

 BCOH 046 Merisotis, Jamie May 12, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jamie Merisotis was born and raised in Manchester, Connecticut in 1964. At Bates College he majored in Political Science and was editor-in-chief of the Bates Student. After his sophomore year at Bates he did an internship with the Washington Monthly Magazine. He graduated from Bates in 1986. After graduation he became a research assistant for the Washington office of the College Board. In 1991, Merisotis served as a consultant on a commission appointed to examine the federal role in the financing of higher education. Later he was asked to be the executive director. In 1993 he founded the Institute for Higher Education Policy, or IHEP, where he continues to work in 2006. He is also on the Board of Trustees for Bates College.

Scope and Content note

The Manchester community; The public school system; Deciding on Bates; Coming to Bates; Professors; The social environment; Extra-curricular activities; Internship at the Washington Monthly; Work on the College Board; Getting an Op Ed piece published in the Washington Post; Working on the federal commission; Creating IHEP (Institute for Higher Education Policy); Bates College Trustee; Benjamin Mays.

 BCOH 115 Mixer, Phyllis Ione July 16, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Phyllis Mixer was born in Minot, Maine and grew up in Mechanic Falls, Maine. She graduated from Mechanic Falls High School in 1939 and from the Auburn Maine School of Commerce. Ms. Mixer worked for 18 years as the secretary and then executive secretary to the general manager and treasurer of Continental Mills until the Lewiston mill was liquidated in 1961. She then began working for George W. Lane, Jr. who was the treasurer of Bates College. She was appointed controller in 1973 and retired in 1985.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Ms. Mixer discusses: Bates’ financial records including the physical transfer of the records from Depositor’s Trust Bank to the College; Bates’ financial officers including George W. Lane, Norm Ross, Edwin Adams and Bernard Carpenter; increasing complexity of College’s finances; manual recordkeeping to computers.

 BCOH 026 Moody, Jim June 13, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Leander “Jim” Moody was born on November 23, 1931 in Manchester, NH. His family moved to Gorham, ME shortly after, where he grew up. He attended Gorham High School and entered Bates in the fall of 1949, graduating in 1953. After Bates, he became chairman and CEO of Hannaford Brothers. He became a member of the Bates College Board of Trustees in 1968, and he became chairman of the board in 1987, a position that he held until his retirement in 2001.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Gorham, ME; Visiting Bates; Classes at Bates--Cultch; Sports at Bates; Social life at Bates; Charles Phillips; Hedley Reynolds; Don Harward; Lifelong friends from Bates; Norm Ross; Sampsonville; Future plans for the college; Master Plan; “Ducky” Pond.

 BCOH 003 Moore-Leamon, Silver January 6, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Silver Moore-Leamon was born on January 17, 1934 in Reading, Pennsylvania. Her mother of Pennsylvania Dutch descent was a homemaker, and her father worked as a music teacher and newspaper man. He also worked many odd jobs to put food on the table. After graduation from High School, she attended Bates College with a full academic scholarship. There, she majored in Chemistry and was an avid debater for Professor of Debate Brooks Quimby. After Bates she attended the University of Colorado to get her PhD in Organic Chemistry, but did not end up earning her degree. She later returned to Bates College as the wife of Professor James Leamon.

Scope and Contents note

Reading, Pennsylvania; Social restraints of women at Bates College; Charles Phillips; John Willis and religion; Bates College and the community; Mayorality; Diversity on campus; Professor Lawrance and chemistry; Lewiston League of Women Voters; Bates College Needles Club; Students from Kenya; Louis Jalbert; Political corruption in Lewiston; Sugar Beet Project; Social double-standards and racism.

 BCOH 004 Morton, Erma March 3, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Erma Tetley Morton was born in Topsham, Maine, on February 4, 1910. Her daughter, Mary Morton Cowan, was born in Portland, Maine, on August 31, 1939. Both mother and daughter have lived in Maine throughout their lives and both attended Bates College, graduating respectively in 1929 and 1961. Erma’s father was also a Bates graduate, class of 1899, which led Erma to decide to go to Bates. Her grandson, Tim Cowan, was a fourth generation Bates graduate in the class of 1991. Both Erma and Mary majored in English, and they even had several of the same teachers. Mary has always had an interest in architecture, and has since designed several homes, as well as becoming an award winning children’s writer. Erma went on to become an English and Drama teacher. Both continue an active connection with the Bates community.

Scope and Contents note

Personal backgrounds; what led them to Bates College; influential teachers and figures from Bates College; generational differences at Bates; historical context; life after Bates; interesting stories from their time at Bates.

 BCOH 116 Moser, Thomas July 14, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Thomas Moser was born in 1935 in Chicago, Illinois. He graduated from the State University of New York at Geneseo with a B.S. in Speech Education and earned his M.A. and Ph.D from the University of Michigan. He spent a year in Saudi Arabia teaching English as a second language and also taught at the University of Maine in Orono for a year. In 1967 Moser came to Bates as associate professor of speech and debate coach. He also served as the advisor to the African-American Society. During the 1973-74 academic year, Dr. Moser took a leave of absence to pursue his interest in furniture building and consequently made the decision not return to Bates. He is the founder of Thomas Moser Cabinetmakers in Auburn, Maine.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Moser discusses: his background and decision to teach at Bates; Brooks Quimby and the debate program; interactions with and changes in the students during the late 1960s; changes in curriculum; minority students and the African American Society; his relationship with other faculty members; classes he taught; anecdotes concerning Garvey MacLean, George Fetter, Bryant Gumbel, George Healy and Thomas Hedley Reynolds; relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; his thoughts concerning the College’s mission; and reasons for leaving teaching. .

 BCOH 064 Muller, Ernest 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Ernest Muller was born April 9, 1918 in Brooklyn, New York and attended Brooklyn public schools. He received his B.A. from Ursinus College and M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Columbia University. Muller served as a Navy pilot during World War II and joined the Bates faculty in 1950 as an instructor in the history department. Dr. Muller served as chair of the department for many years teaching courses on Latin America and American history. He also served on the Colby, Bates and Bowdoin committee that founded Maine’s public television station. He retired in 1988. The Ernest P. Muller Prize in History is awarded to the graduating history major whose senior thesis is judged most outstanding by vote of the history faculty.

Scope and Contents note

Interview traces themes and changes from 1950 to the late 1980s related to Bates College and the College’s relationship to national politics, with a focus on the 1960s: the reputation and standing of the College; the faculty’s role at the College and students’ role at the College; the College’s stance towards Communism, McCarthyism, the Vietnam War, and the Civil Rights Movement; student and faculty public political acts; the significance of 1960s counter-culture at Bates; College’s sexual harassment policy; Muller’s relationship to the College—especially to students—and his personal stance on many of the issues mentioned above.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 068 Muller, Ernest circa 1989   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Ernest Muller was born April 9, 1918 in Brooklyn, New York and attended Brooklyn public schools. He received his B.A. from Ursinus College and M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Columbia University. Muller served as a Navy pilot during World War II and joined the Bates faculty in 1950 as an instructor in the history department. Dr. Muller served as chair of the department for many years teaching courses on Latin America and American history. He also served on the Colby, Bates and Bowdoin committee that founded Maine’s public television station. He retired in 1988. The Ernest P. Muller Prize in History is awarded to the graduating history major whose senior thesis is judged most outstanding by vote of the history faculty.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Muller’s reflections on the changes at Bates College during Reynolds’s presidency: statistics reflecting growth and the effect of Ladd Library and Olin Arts Center on the College; Muller’s relationship with Hedley Reynolds; Reynolds’s character and abilities as president; and the value of a liberal arts education

General note

The interview was conducted by Anthony Nguyen ‘89 and Melissa Friedling ’91 to document the presidency of Thomas Hedley Reynolds. Footage was included in the documentary video, "The Reynolds Years,” produced by the students and supervised by Professor Robert Branham, on the occasion of Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 134 Muller, Ernest and Acquilla (Peg) July 20, 1999   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Ernest Muller was born April 9, 1918 in Brooklyn, New York and attended Brooklyn public schools. He received his B.A. from Ursinus College and M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Columbia University. Muller served as a Navy pilot during World War II and joined the Bates faculty in 1950 as an instructor in the history department. Dr. Muller served as chair of the department for many years teaching courses on Latin America and American history. He also served on the Colby, Bates and Bowdoin committee that founded Maine’s public television station. He retired in 1988.

Acquilla “Peg” Muller was born in Buffalo, New York, and grew up in Snyder, now Amherst, New York. She attended Ursinus College, where she and Ernest met. She was the ticket manager and house manager of the Bates theater department for many years

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Dr. Muller discusses his experiences during World War II; his years at Bates including courses he taught, such as Cultural Heritage, and the development of the history department; mayoralty, chapel and women’s rules; chaperoning of outings and events by both he and his wife; living in Sampsonville; John Willis affair; relationship between students and the faculty; contrasts between the eras of President Phillips and President Reynolds; relationship between faculty and administration and between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; and relationship with faculty at Bowdoin and Colby.

 BCOH 021 Muller, Ernie & Peg May 24, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Ernest Paul Muller was born on May 24, 2005 in Brooklyn, NY. His parents were Ernest Sr., a butcher, and Margaret (Zipke) Muller. Attended Brooklyn public schools, Ursinus College graduate, class of ’40, fought in WWII, then did his graduate work at Columbia. Taught History at Bates from 1950 to 1988, and among other things was a member of the faculty group called “The Wranglers”.

“Peg” Acquilla Elissa Stettenbenz was born in Buffalo, New York, and grew up in Snyder, now Amherst, New York. Attended Ursinus, where she and Ernie met. She became ticket manager and house manager of the theater department for many years, and knew Lavinia Schaeffer.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Brooklyn; Cultural diversity in Brooklyn; Growing up in Snyder, now Amherst; Ursinus College; Development of the History department; Peg working at Bates; Theater in Hathorn; Lavinia Schaeffer; Schaeffer Theater; Costumes; Wranglers; Needle Club; Round Table; Faculty-Trustee relations; Sampsonville.

 BCOH 140 Myhrman, Mildred May 1991   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Mildred Beckman Myhrman graduated from Bates in 1930 and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Following graduation she went to Cleveland where she earned her master’s in social work from Western Reserve School of Applied Social Services in 1934. She returned to Lewiston in 1935 and married Bates College sociology professor Anders Myhrman. Mrs. Myhrman was an instructor in the College’s sociology department and worked as a psychiatric social worker with the Androscoggin County Mental Health Association. She is a volunteer for many service organizations and a member of the United Baptist Church in Lewiston.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers purpose/uses of chapel; attendance, speakers, and penalties for overcutting; criticism/opposition to chapel religious services; comments on chapel services and/or religion courses as career path to ministry; role of YMCA/YWCA and Christian Association in social life of the College; attendance and involvement with local churches; differences between chapel and local churches; comments on significance of chapel to her college education

General note

The interview was conducted for Robert Branham’s short term course Documentary Video Production.

 BCOH 090 Nichols, Margaret June 30, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Margaret Nichols was born in Lewiston, Maine on March 10, 1923. After graduating from Edward Little High School in Auburn, Maine she attended the Baypath School in Springfield, MA. Subsequently, she moved to Hartford, CT where she worked for the city health department for about six years. After returning to Lewiston, Mrs. Nichols was hired as a secretary in the Registrar’s Office at Bates College. She became Recorder in 1952, and in 1966 she was appointed Registrar. Mrs. Nichols retired in December 1992.

Scope and Contents note

Mrs. Nichols discusses the functioning of the Registrar’s Office and the changes that took place during her tenure including: the process of registering for classes and scheduling classrooms; typing exams; arranging seating for finals and for chapel; short term; the attendance cut book; the computerization of the Registrar’s office; interactions with faculty and students; differences in the college under President Phillips and President Reynolds; also discusses her volunteer activities and travels.

 BCOH 117 Norris, Jane July 7, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jane Norris was born on July 30, 1924 in Lewiston, Maine. She graduated from Edward Little High School in 1942 and from Bates College in 1946 with a degree in economics. Norris began her career with Mechanics Savings Bank as a teller in 1950. She went on to serve as a loan officer, operations officer and vice president before being appointed CEO in 1979. In 1982, Norris became the first woman in Maine to be named a bank president. She served as president and CEO until her retirement in 1989. She continues to serve on the bank’s board of directors. Throughout her career she has served on a number of local boards of directors including Bates College, Central Maine Medical Center, Central Maine Community College, Center for Financial Studies and Patron’s Oxford Mutual Insurance Company.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Norris discusses: her banking career; anecdotes about her father, George Parsons, class of 1899 and his classmate, William Saunders; town girls club, Lambda Alpha; classes; relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; reflections on Rayborn Zerby, Bernard Carpenter, President Thomas Hedley Reynolds and President Don Harward; and changes in the College.

 BCOH 118 Payne, Jean LeMire August 17, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Jean LeMire Payne was born on January 13, 1932 in Quincy, Massachusetts. She graduated from Old Town High School in Old Town, Maine in 1949 and from Bates College in 1953 where she majored in speech. In 1952 Jean represented Maine in the Miss USA pageant in Long Beach, California. After graduation and marriage she taught for a year at Lewiston High School and then became a homemaker. In 1970 Jean became acquisitions assistant in the Bates College library and retired in 1990.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Payne discusses: details of her youth in Old Town and her relationships with family and friends; anecdotes about her time at Bates and working in the library.

 BCOH 027 Pepin, W. Reid June 10, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

W. Reid Pepin was born in Lowell, MA on May 21, 1932, where he grew up. He attended Dartmouth for one year, then came to Bates, graduating in the class of 1955. While at Bates, he was very active in the Outing Club and has many stories to tell. He went on to McGill to study Dentistry, then returned to Lowell and practiced dentistry with his father and uncle to continue the family occupational tradition started by his grandfather.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Lowell, Massachusetts; Applying to Bates; Bates in the early fifties; The Outing Club; The Appalachian Trail; Memorable professors; Cultural Heritage; Sadie Hawkins Day; Mayoralty; Bow and arrow Story; Outing Club Advances; Coed Work Trip #1; Coed Work Trip #2; Batesies marrying Batesies; Chuck Phillips; The Bates Spirit; Water skiing story; Hearse story; Ladies hunting story.

 BCOH 065 Pethick, Rachel March 15, 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Rachel (Harper) Pethick graduated from Bates College in 1962 with a B.A. in English. She has been the Director of Alumni Relations since 1984.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Pethick’s observations and reflections about students’ social world at Bates from 1958 to the early 1960s: women’s physical education--posture pictures; Bates’s Mayorality tradition and its collapse; off-campus parties at rented halls; pranks; different rules for women and men; Bates activities: Betty Bates, the Sadie Hawkins dance, dining hall food, College Bowl, and football; a comparison of her social world as a student at Bates to that of the 1980s; and the costs and benefits to students of the changed college of the 1980s.

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews. Footage from the interview is used in Student Union, a student- and faculty-produced documentary on student social life in the early 1960s.

 BCOH 075 Phillips, Charles 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Charles Franklin Phillips served as Bates fourth President, from 1944 to 1967. Phillips guided the College into the post-war years, continuing to expand the academic offerings and the faculty, and placing more of an emphasis on business and economic training for students. Phillips also oversaw the creation of the "Bates Plan of Education," which continued to emphasize the centrality of liberal arts education during a student’s academic tenure. The campus physical presence also grew, as some fourteen buildings were added.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers description of College during the late 1950s and early 1960s including composition of student body, men’s and women’s side of the campus; women’s rules; social life; events such as Mayoralty and Winter Carnival; football games; also includes campus political activity including whether the College was conservative or liberal, campus support of Vietnam War, and his personal thoughts about Vietnam War and Communism; meetings/discussions with presidents of Bowdoin, Colby and University of Maine at Orono; collaboration on WCBB; drug/alcohol use on campus; his relationship with students including meeting with representatives of both student government groups; comments on the 4/3 option plan which divided the campus; changes in student attitudes and appearance; planning his retirement from the College; time spent working on College business vs his involvement with various company boards; comments about Peter Gomes and several students who died in Vietnam

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews.

 BCOH 006 Potter, Sarah March 10, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Sarah Emerson Potter was born on February 19th, 1955, in New Haven, Connecticut. Her father, Horton Emerson Jr., was a professor of American History, and after a brief relocation to the South, Sarah’s family moved to Gorham, Maine. After graduating from Gorham High School, she attended Bates College following in the footsteps of her brother, John W. Emerson, class of 1973 . After graduating with a degree in English, she worked in a bookstore and as a rehab counselor at Pathways in South Portland, Maine. After marrying, she returned to Bates College as an assistant alumni director. After about a year, she was able to take a job in the college bookstore. A few years later, she became manager. She is currently Director of the Bates College Bookstore, in charge of central purchasing.

Scope and Contents note

Gorham, Maine; Searching for Colleges; Admissions interview with Milt Lindholm; Faculty members of Bates College; George Fetter; Sadie Hawkins Dance; Alcohol on Campus; Bob Chute; Dick Sampson; Jim Leamon; Bates College Bookstore; Jim Carignan; Gender equality issues; Important characteristics of Bates College; Bates College and the community; Harry Rowe; Burning of the old gymnasium; Werner Deiman and homosexuality; Ethnicity of Bates students; White Supremacist rally.

 BCOH 091 Provencher, Robert August 6, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert Provencher was born in Lewiston, Maine in 1929 and graduated from Lewiston High School in 1948. After spending two years in the service during the Korean War, Mr. Provencher returned home and entered the University of Maine in 1953. Following his graduation from college in 1957, Mr. Provencher began his teaching career at Lewiston High School where he taught social studies and coached football, hockey and track. After earning his master’s degree from the University of Southern Maine in 1972, Mr. Provencher became principal of two Lewiston elementary schools. Following his retirement from the Lewiston School Department in 1986, he became the equipment manager at Merrill Gymnasium and remained in that position until leaving in 1990.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Provencher discusses: the duties and tasks of the equipment manager; his early affiliation with Bates and recollections of Bates athletics and coaches; his experiences as a teacher and administrator in the Lewiston School system; and his student days at the University of Maine.

 BCOH 076 Rainwater-August, Estellita Gonzales September 6, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Estellita Gonzales Rainwater-August was born on September 8, 1938 in Charlottesville, Virginia to Mabel Elizabeth Sims and Mario Gonzales. Her paternal grandparents were Robert P. Sims, president of the Bluefield Colored Institute and Stella James Sims, an 1897 graduate of Bates and the first African American woman graduate of the college. She lived with her paternal grandparents on their farm in Perkiomenville, Pennsylvania off and on until she was out of high school. Estellita then married a military man and lived in Europe before returning to Pennsylvania. She eventually moved to Aurora, Colorado and attended the University of Colorado, Boulder Extension and Colorado State University. Estellita spent 30 years working for Delta Airlines, retiring in 1998.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview there was an exchange of information between Ms. Rainwater-August and interviewers John Smedley and James Reese which included: Sims family background; life with Robert and Stella Sims on their farm; Stella Sims background; information from a former student of Mrs. Sims; relationship between Bates College and Storer College; Estellita's background.

 BCOH 077 Raiss, Linda Rolfe June 14, 2009   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Linda Rolfe Raiss was born in Boston, Massachusetts on July 27, 1942 and grew up in Braintree, Massachusetts. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and lived in Wilson House, rooming with Patricia Parsons Kay. Linda spent her junior year abroad as an independent student studying at the Institute for Foreign Students in Aix-en-Provence. She graduated in 1964 with a B.A. in French and served with the Peace Corps in Tunisia. Linda has worked in the Braintree, Massachusetts planning office and is active in town affairs.

Esther Rosenthal Mechler was born in Indianapolis, Indiana on November 22, 1942 and grew up in Nashua, New Hampshire and northern New York. She entered Bates in the fall of 1960 and spent her junior year abroad in Geneva studying psychology with Jean Piaget. Esther received her B.A. degree in 1964 and her Master's and Sixth Year degrees in education from The University of Rochester. She began her career in education, but has been involved with the animal rights/animal welfare movement since the 1970s. In 1990, she founded SPAY/USA, a national referral service for low-cost spaying/neutering.

Patricia Parsons Kay was born on December 14, 1941 in Madison, Wisconsin. She attended Bates for one year (1960-1961) and then transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Patricia spent 1962-63 studying abroad with the University of Wisconsin-Madison's new junior year abroad program in Aix-en Provence, France. She roomed with her former Wilson House roommate, Linda Rolfe Raiss. Patricia graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1964 with a degree in history and French. She also earned her teaching certificate and eventually a master’s degree in library science. Patricia has taught school and been a librarian in Kenya and Australia as well as librarian at the Australian Embassy in Washington, DC.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Esther, Pat and Linda discuss: family backgrounds; decision to attend Bates; occupational opportunities for women; experiences at Bates including influential professors and courses, homework, social activities, women’s rules, seeing John F. Kennedy and Sen. Edmund Muskie in Lewiston before 1960 election; Junior Year Abroad experiences including application process, living accommodations, sightseeing and travels, classes, isolation and limited communication with families.

 BCOH 119 Randall, Barbara June 30, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Barbara Ann Varney Randall was born on December 4th, 1925 in Dallas, Texas and moved with her family to Lewiston, Maine in 1930. She attended Bates College, just three blocks from her home on College St., graduating in 1946. She worked at the Jordan Pond House in Seal Harbor and as a gym instructor at the State School for Girls in Hallowell. In 1947 she returned to Bates College to work in the News Bureau. In March of 1952, she moved to Philadelphia and worked with an advertising agency called N. C. Ayer. Barbara began her graduate education at UNH, and received her Masters degree in education from University of Maine, Orono in 1960. She was Dean of Women at Bates College from 1960-1969 and later was an alumni trustee for five years. She currently lives in Auburn.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Randall discusses: relationship between Bates and the Lewiston community; living at home while attending Bates; social life and activities; Bates during WWII; many stories and anecdotes of faculty and staff including Professor Fred Knapp, Professor Peter Bertocci, Professor Robert Berkelman, Professor Fred Pomeroy and President Charles Phillips; working in the Bates News Bureau and experiences and responsibilities as Dean of Women.

 BCOH 044 Randall, Barbara April 14, 2006   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Barbara Ann Varney Randall was born on December 4th, 1925 in Dallas, Texas and moved with her family to Lewiston, Maine in 1930. Her mother was a nurse and her father was in advertising. She attended Bates College, just three blocks from her home on College St., graduating in 1946. She worked at the Jordan Pond House in Seal Harbor and as a gym instructor at the State School for Girls in Hallowell. In 1947 she returned to Bates College to work in the News Bureau. In March of 1952, She moved to Philadelphia and worked with an advertising agency called N. C. Ayer. She began her graduate education at UNH, and received her Masters degree in education from University of Maine, Orono in 1960. She then became the Dean of Women at Bates College in 1960. She left that position in 1969. She later was an alumni trustee for five years. She currently lives in Auburn.

Scope and Contents note

Moving from Texas to Lewiston; Parents’ careers; The Great Depression; Living at home while attending Bates; The downtown area; Deciding on Bates; Bates during WWII; Mrs. And Mr. Lawton; Favorite professors; First jobs; Working in the news bureau; Going to graduate school; Becoming the Dean of Women; Campus changes in the sixties; Responsibilities as Dean of Women; The transition from Phillips to Reynolds; The changes Bates has undergone; The role of the president; remaining involved in Bates.

 BCOH 043 Reynolds, Thomas Hedley April 5, 2006   2.0 audiocassette(s)

 BCOH 066 Reynolds, Thomas Hedley circa 1989   2.0 vhs videocassette(s)

Biographical note

Thomas Hedley Reynolds was inaugurated as the fifth President of Bates College in 1967. He graduated from Williams College in 1942, afterwards attending Office Candidate School and enlisting in the United States Army. He served for two and a half years as a tank commander in North Africa and Italy and was decorated by both the United States and France. After the war, Reynolds returned to school in New York City, where he worked for his doctorate at Columbia University, while simultaneously teaching at Hunter College. From 1948 to 1949 he worked as a historian for the American Red Cross. In 1949 he accepted a position in the history department at Middlebury College, becoming head of the department and Dean of Men in 1957, and Dean of the College in 1964. Reynolds is completing twenty-two years as president and will retire in 1989

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Reynolds’ reflections on his presidency including committee management; board management; fundraising; and prioritizing needs of the college; also discusses Bates’ course calendar (4/3 plan); the impact of the Vietnam War on campus; the impact of nationally changing gender norms; the creation of central social space on campus; faculty and departmental development; the expansion of facilities including Ladd Library, Olin Arts Center, and the Muskie Archives; the relationship between the College and Edmund Muskie; the history of Bates’ crew team; and student recruitment.

General note

The interview was conducted by Anthony Nguyen ‘89 and Melissa Friedling ’91 to document the presidency of Thomas Hedley Reynolds. Footage was included in the documentary video, The Reynolds Years, produced by the students and supervised by Professor Robert Branham, on the occasion of Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 142 Reynolds, Thomas Hedley 1984 or 1988   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Thomas Hedley Reynolds was inaugurated as the fifth President of Bates College in 1967. He graduated from Williams College in 1942, afterwards attending Office Candidate School and enlisting in the United States Army. He served for two and a half years as a tank commander in North Africa and Italy and was decorated by both the United States and France. After the war, Reynolds returned to school in New York City, where he worked for his doctorate at Columbia University, while simultaneously teaching at Hunter College. From 1948 to 1949 he worked as a historian for the American Red Cross. In 1949 he accepted a position in the history department at Middlebury College, becoming head of the department and Dean of Men in 1957, and Dean of the College in 1964.

Scope and Contents note

In the interview Reynolds discusses colleges during the 1960s and Bates in particular; describes social issues including the process for the creation of parietal hours and co-ed dorms; building renovations including Chase Hall; building of Ladd Library; faculty development including recruitment, increase in pay scale and enlargement of duties; interactions/communications with students; dealing with student frustrations with national government--Vietnam Moratorium and Sen. Muskie’s visit; Kent State incident and downtown Lewiston clean-up; changes in curriculum and the College calendar including freshman seminars, core courses, 4/3 option plan and development of current short term; cap gun incident at commencement

General note

The interview was conducted for The Sixties, an interdisciplinary General Studies course taught by professors Robert Branham, Ned Harwood, Steve Hochstadt, and William Matthews.

 BCOH 092 Riley, Mary July 21, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mary Riley was born in Lewiston, Maine on March 6, 1931. She graduated from Lewiston High School and from the University of Maine at Orono, where she was a Latin major. Following the completion of her undergraduate studies, she spent about five years teaching at various private schools in Massachusetts and Maine. Shortly after marrying in 1958, she began working in the Circulation Department of Coram Library and also began working towards her MLS degree by taking summer courses at Simmons Graduate School of Library Science. Mrs. Riley continued to work at the Bates Library through most of the 1960s, except for two periods of time when her daughters were born. In 1972 she assumed the part-time position of Special Collections Librarian and remained in that position until her retirement in 1996.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Riley discusses several topics including: growing up in the Lewiston-Auburn communities; attending Bates events such as Mayoralty and Little Theater productions; her experiences and duties working in circulation; the transition from Coram Library to Ladd Library; changes in library staff; the evolution of special collections including the Berent, Phelps, Stanton and Maine Small press book collections and material on Shiloh and her recollections of President Phillips, President Reynolds and President Harward.

 BCOH 120 Rose, Harvey July 20, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Harvey Rose was born November 20, 1919 in Greene, Maine and graduated from Leavitt Institute in Turner in 1937. Mr. Rose worked at W. H. Gammon Cabinets and after his marriage to Elsie Young in 1942, became a self-employed dairy farmer. He was later employed by J.M. Tanguay in Greene and by Carter Milling as mill foreman. In 1965 Mr. Rose began work for Bates College in the maintenance department, retiring in 1985 as head carpenter.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Rose discusses his employment in the maintenance department including the various types of work he did such as repairs of windows, chairs and furniture, remodeling of Bates owned houses and some plumbing; growth of the department and relationship with co-workers; dorm damage and co-worker pranks.

 BCOH 073 Ross, Norman   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Norman Ross was born in Kennebunkport, Maine in 1898. He graduated from Biddeford High School in 1917 and entered Bates that fall. Drafted during World War I, Mr. Ross served as a director of the Student Army Training Corp at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He returned to Bates and graduated in 1922 with a B.S. in physics and mathematics. After graduation he became a teacher and coach at Brandon (Vt.) High School and in 1924 was appointed assistant bursar at Bates. Mr. Ross became bursar and superintendent of buildings and grounds in 1928 and was named treasurer in 1963. After forty-four years of service to the College he retired in 1968. Mr. Ross also served as the president and chairman of the board of the Androscoggin Savings Bank, chairman of the board of Central Maine General Hospital, now Central Maine Medical Center, and is a long time member of the United Baptist Church of Lewiston. He and his wife, Marjorie Pillsbury Ross ‘23, live at 32 Frye Street.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Norman Ross’s observations about the organization of compulsory chapel in the 1910s and 1920s: schedule, attendance, speakers, music, and seating; the role of compulsory chapel in student social life; relations between students and administrators; Ross’s reflections on religion in society: religious pluralism, the authority of Protestantism, and the significance of the decline in churchgoing; personal growth in chapel; the relationship between classroom teaching and chapel; comments on Bates football, Bates debate, and co-ed dormitories; Ross’s relationship to students; gender relations at Bates in early 1920s; men and women’s social roles; and race relations at the College.

General note

Marjorie Ross does not appear on camera but does make several comments during the interview. The interview was conducted for Robert Branham’s short term course Documentary Video Production and footage was included in the student produced documentary film The Secular Cathedral: Bates College Chapel.

 BCOH 093 Ross, Norman April 25, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Norman Ross was born in Kennebunkport, Maine in 1898. He graduated from Biddeford High School in 1917 and entered Bates that fall. Drafted during World War I, Mr. Ross served as a director of the Student Army Training Corp at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He returned to Bates and graduated in 1922 with a B.S. in physics and mathematics. After graduation he became a teacher and coach at Brandon (Vt.) High School and in 1924 was appointed assistant bursar at Bates. Mr. Ross became bursar and superintendent of buildings and grounds in 1928 and was named treasurer in 1963. After forty-four years of service to the College he retired in 1968. Mr. Ross also served as the president and chairman of the board of the Androscoggin Savings Bank, chairman of the board of Central Maine General Hospital, now Central Maine Medical Center, and is a long time member of the United Baptist Church of Lewiston. He and his wife, Marjorie Pillsbury Ross ‘23, lived at 32 Frye Street for over seventy years.

Scope and Contents note

In this first of three interviews Mr. Ross discusses several topics pertaining to his student days at Bates: how he came to attend Bates; interactions and memories of faculty; debating; Military Science Club; the curriculum and teaching style; social life including dancing; dining halls; church attendance; student workers; and recollections of Benjamin Mays and President Gray.

 BCOH 094 Ross, Norman and Wade, Robert April 30, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Norman Ross was born in Kennebunkport, Maine in 1898. He graduated from Biddeford High School in 1917 and entered Bates that fall. Drafted during World War I, Mr. Ross served as a director of the Student Army Training Corp at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He returned to Bates and graduated in 1922 with a B.S. in physics and mathematics. After graduation he became a teacher and coach at Brandon (Vt.) High School and in 1924 was appointed assistant bursar at Bates. Mr. Ross became bursar and superintendent of buildings and grounds in 1928 and was named treasurer in 1963. After forty-four years of service to the College he retired in 1968. Mr. Ross also served as the president and chairman of the board of the Androscoggin Savings Bank, chairman of the board of Central Maine General Hospital, now Central Maine Medical Center, and is a long time member of the United Baptist Church of Lewiston. He and his wife, Marjorie Pillsbury Ross ‘23, lived at 32 Frye Street for over seventy years.

Robert Wade was born in Rockland, Massachusetts in 1900. After graduating from Rockland High School in 1918 he enlisted in the Student Army Training Corps at Bates College. After his discharge at the end of the war, he enrolled at Bates and graduated in 1923. He attended the Harvard School of Business Administration and was owner and president of the Morton, Hall and Rounds investment firm. Mr. Wade was a member of the Maine Legislature from 1954-1961 and was a life director of Androscoggin Savings Bank. He married his classmate, Nellie Milliken Wade in 1926.

Scope and Cotents note

In this joint interview, Mr. Ross and Mr. Wade talk about: experiences in the Student Army Training Corp during World War I; on-campus and off-campus student job opportunities; experiences eating in JB (John Bertram) Commons; various faculty members including Karl Woodcock, R.R. N. Gould, William Whitehorne and J. Murray Carroll; courses taught by upperclassmen; tutoring and being a departmental student assistant; debates and track meets held in City Hall.

 BCOH 095 Ross, Norman May 23, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Norman Ross was born in Kennebunkport, Maine in 1898. He graduated from Biddeford High School in 1917 and entered Bates that fall. Drafted during World War I, Mr. Ross served as a director of the Student Army Training Corp at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He returned to Bates and graduated in 1922 with a B.S. in physics and mathematics. After graduation he became a teacher and coach at Brandon (Vt.) High School and in 1924 was appointed assistant bursar at Bates. Mr. Ross became bursar and superintendent of buildings and grounds in 1928 and was named treasurer in 1963. After forty-four years of service to the College he retired in 1968. Mr. Ross also served as the president and chairman of the board of the Androscoggin Savings Bank, chairman of the board of Central Maine General Hospital, now Central Maine Medical Center, and is a long time member of the United Baptist Church of Lewiston. He and his wife, Marjorie Pillsbury Ross ‘23, lived at 32 Frye Street for over seventy years.

Scope and Contents note

In this third interview Mr. Ross discusses: his memories of Harry Rowe, George Lane, Fred Pomeroy and Gertrude Campbell; College finances; the burning of the old gym; receiving and storing shipments of coal for the heating system; campus maintenance; helping students finance their education including jobs in maintenance, the library and as bell ringers; and the first million dollar fund-raising campaign.

 BCOH Rowe, Harry 1977   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Harry Willison Rowe was born in Mercer, Maine, on November 13, 1887, to Willison and Penny Louisa (Groves) Rowe. In 1900, shortly after the death of his mother, Harry was sent to live with a family in Pittsfield, Maine, where he worked performing chores in the boarding house and farm they ran, and attended classes at Pittsfield Grammar School. Shortly afterward he attended Maine Central Institute, graduating in 1906. Between 1906 and 1908, when he entered Bates College, Rowe served as the principal for the Troy High School, as well as serving as pastor to the Baptist Churches in Eastbrook and Waltham, Maine. While at Bates, one of Rowe's significant activities was debating, and he was generally known as one of the best speakers in his class. During this time, he also served as the pastor at the Baptist Church in Lisbon Falls for three years. Following graduation in 1912, Rowe worked as the field secretary for the Maine Christian Endeavor society until 1914, when he was hired as the secretary to the Student YMCA at Bates, beginning 44 years of service to the school. Rowe also served as Bursar, Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds, Alumni Secretary, Dean of Admission for Men, Assistant to the President, and in 1946 was appointed to be Bates' first Dean of Faculty, which he held until his retirement in 1958. Rowe was named Dean emeritus upon his retirement and became the unofficial Bates College historian and archivist.

Scope and Contents note

Interview conducted to gather material for “Harry Rowe Remembers,” an article in February 1977 issue of the Bates College Bulletin; includes selection of Lewiston as site of College; reflections on character of Oren B. Cheney; thoughts on President Chase including his commitment to religious life, his frugality and his building and fundraising work for Bates; construction of Chase Hall; beginning of debate; reflections of President Gray and his tenure including building up of faculty, steering College through the Depression; comments on several faculty members; campus climate and procuring V-12 Naval Training Program for College; selection of President Phillips and his appeal to business community; Bates Plan of education; increase in administrative staff and alumni support

 BCOH 121 Sampson, Richard July 15, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Richard Sampson was born in Newton, Massachusetts in 1922. He earned his B.S. at Bowdoin in 1944, studied at MIT, and earned his Ed.M. at Tufts in 1947. Through 1950 he taught at the Franklin Institute of Technology in Boston and earned his M.A. in mathematics at Boston University in 1951. Before coming to Bates in 1952 to teach mathematics, Sampson taught at The New Preparatory School in Cambridge, MA. As the faculty advisor to the Bates Outing Club for 25 years, Professor Sampson worked to ensure that students powered the club and controlled their budget. He also encouraged his students to be active in the surrounding community. Professor Sampson retired in 1990.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Richard Sampson discusses: his impressions of Harry Rowe, the College and Lewiston; relationship between Bates and the community; his involvement with the local community including LPL Plus and L/A Arts; relationship with faculty colleagues including Percy Wilkins, Carroll Bailey and Chester Laxon; changes in math department including faculty and curriculum; his involvement with Outing Club including trips and relationships with students; minority students; impressions of Judith Isaacson, President Phillips and President Reynolds; student political activity.

 BCOH 037 Scott, Ann Besser September 15, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Ann Besser Scott was born on June 8, 1933 in Newark, New Jersey. Ann’s father was a CPA and her mother was a lawyer. Ann attended Radcliffe, an all-women’s college, which was incorporated by Harvard. After Radcliffe, she went on to Brandeis where she pursued her M.A. and eventually her Ph.D.. Ann began her teaching career at the University of Chicago, before deciding to move to the east coast. She joined the Bates College faculty in 1973 as a music professor. Ann was chair of the music department for 23 years at Bates, worked for the Dean’s office and was one of a handful of tenured female professors. She officially retired in 2004.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; influence of mother and father; going to Radcliffe College; beginning her teaching career; being hired by Bates; history of the Music Department; staff of the Music Department; interview to get teaching job; music resources in Ladd Library; developing a Music major; current state of the Music Department; women faculty members; full professor’s dinner; working in the Dean’s Office; life after Bates.

 BCOH 096 Slovenski, Walter July 30, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Walter Slovenski was born in Dupont, Pennsylvania in 1920. He graduated from Syracuse University (where he played baseball and basketball, and was on the track team) in 1949, and the following year enrolled in a master’s program at New York University. In 1951 he went to Oneonta (NY) State Teacher’s College to be head basketball coach. Hired by Bates in 1952 as track coach and freshman football coach, he resurrected the cross country program in 1958 and built it into a consistent winner. Slovenski, who retired from Bates in 1995 after 43 years of coaching, led his Bobcat track and cross country teams to 726 victories, five undefeated seasons, more than 20 State of Maine championships and four New England regional championships.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview, Mr. Slovenski talks about: his coaching style; the football program and some of the difficulties it has faced; outstanding track athletes; athletic facilities; admission of athletes in the 1950s and 1960s; the beginnings of coed physical education and the evolution of women’s sports and Title IX; changes in coaching staff; and changes in physical education requirements.

 BCOH 040 Spaulding, Richard November 21, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Stan Bubier was born in Lewiston, Maine on April 7, 1950. He grew up in Greene, Maine and attended Greene Central and then went on to Leavitt Institute in Turner for high school. He grew up on a dairy farm and continues to own race horses.

Richard Spaulding was born in Lewiston on July 15, 1945. He moved to nearby Lisbon when he was four years old. Spaulding’s father worked at Bates as an electrician and his mother worked at Bates as a maid. Richard Spaulding first came to Bates in the mid 60s and started working on the grounds. At the time, both of his parents were working at Bates as well.

Scope and Contents note

Working at Bates; physical plant personnel; student getting stuck on the roof story; pranks by students; various construction jobs around campus; notorious dorms; presidents of Bates; changes in relationships with students; Puddle stories.

 BCOH 029 Straub, Carl July 5, 2005   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Carl Benton Straub was born on April 17, 1936 in Carlisle, PA. His parents were Olivia (Baum) and Ellwood B.F. Straub. Raised in the neighboring town of Mechanicsburg, he received his B.A. from Colgate University; his Ph.D. from Harvard. After accepting a position at Bates in 1965, he began teaching in the Cultural Heritage program “Cultch”. Becoming an associate Professor as well as assistant Dean of the Faculty in 1970, he continued on to serve as Dean of the Faculty for seventeen years. He was appointed the Clark A. Griffith Professor of Environmental Studies in 1996 and retired in 2005.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up in Carlisle, PA; educational background; interviewing at Bates; teaching in the Cultural Heritage “Cultch”; Charles “Prexy” Phillips; short-term; Donkey/horse prank; Hedley Reynolds; Diversity at Bates; New England Small Athletic Conference; Donald Harward; Olin Arts Center; Elaine Hansen; Rand Field; Dedication of Muskie Archives; President Jimmy Carter; commencement speakers; Bates during Vietnam; Conscientious objectors; guiding principles of the college; religious foundation.

 BCOH 052 Straub, Carl circa 1979   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Carl Benton Straub was born on April 17, 1936 in Carlisle, PA. His parents were Olivia (Baum) and Ellwood B.F. Straub. Raised in the neighboring town of Mechanicsburg, he received his B.A. from Colgate University and his Ph.D. from Harvard. After accepting a position at Bates in 1965, he began as an instructor in Religion and Cultural Studies. He was named an associate professor as well as assistant Dean of the Faculty in 1970 before being appointed Dean of the Faculty in 1975.

Scope and Contents note

Interview was conducted for possible article on Bates faculty; covers faculty recruitment and desired faculty demographics; employment policy; faculty statistics; joint appointment policy and new degree requirements

 BCOH 078 Straub, Carl February 26, 2010   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Carl Benton Straub was born on April 17, 1936 in Carlisle, PA. His parents were Olivia (Baum) and Ellwood B.F. Straub. Raised in the neighboring town of Mechanicsburg, he received his B.A. from Colgate University; his Ph.D. from Harvard. After accepting a position at Bates in 1965, he began teaching in the Cultural Heritage program “Cultch”. Becoming an associate Professor as well as assistant Dean of the Faculty in 1970, he continued on to serve as Dean of the Faculty for seventeen years. He was appointed the Clark A. Griffith Professor of Environmental Studies in 1996 and retired in 2005.

Scope and Contents note

Interview includes discussions of: Hedley Reynolds; short term; acquisition of Shortridge and Morse Mountain areas; town-gown relations; planting of shade trees; Portland airport; French street names; physical plant: Olin Arts Center; Ladd Library; Frye Street houses; music and art departments development; Bates campus expansion and housing acquisition; athletics at Bates: NESCAC; Title IX; Androscoggin River land and the rowing program; relationship between faculty and trustees; Hedley’s long term goals; Commencement: weather and traditions; Isador Rabi and the weather story; mortarboard story; and honorary degree recipients: drinking scotch story and grand piano story.

 BCOH 137 Sylvester, Sawyer and Sheila May 11, 2011   1.0 digital recording(s)

Biographical note

Sawyer Sylvester was born in Sanford, Maine on April 17, 1936 and lived there until the age of nine when his family moved to Melrose, Massachusetts. He earned his B.A., J.D., M.A. and Ph.D degrees from Boston University. Dr. Sylvester joined the sociology department at Bates in 1969 and has taught for 42 years. His specialty is criminology. He is a long time member of the library committee and also served on the Lewiston Police Commission.

Sheila Sylvester was born in Stoneham, Massachusetts on March 8, 1940 and grew up in Melrose, Massachusetts. She graduated from the Katherine Gibbs School and worked for the New England Life Insurance Company. After their arrival at Bates in 1969, Sheila worked part time in the assistant to the president’s office and then in the development office. She then moved to the dean of the faculty’s office where she worked until retiring in 2000.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Sawyer and Sheila Sylvester discuss: family background; recollections of President Thomas Hedley Reynolds; Dean of Faculty office; changes in the culture of the college and faculty collegiality; growth in women faculty; changes in sociology department and course offerings; library committee work; changes in the student body; physical changes on campus including Libbey Forum; reflections of President Don Harward; Needle Club; clambakes; work on Police Commission and local politics.

 BCOH 053 Tagilabue, John July 31, 1997   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

John Tagliabue was born in Cantu, Italy on July 1, 1923 near Lake Como. At the age of four, Tagliabue immigrated with his mother and his younger sister to the United States following the emigration of his father and the establishment of his father's restaurant in North Bergen, New Jersey. An ardent enthusiast of literature and reading, John Tagliabue entered Columbia University where he majored in American, English, and Comparative Literature and took several courses in Art History. While at Columbia, Tagliabue was a student of renowned poet Mark Van Doren and studied alongside well known 1950s and 1960s writers and poets of the Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg.

Tagliabue graduated from Columbia University in 1944 with a B.A. degree in English and with a M.A. degree in 1945. Later that year, he left for his first teaching assignment at American University in Beirut, Lebanon. The following year, John Tagliabue married artist and painter, Grace Ten Eyck, who later illustrated many of his poems and created the puppets for his Mario Plays. In 1947, he traveled to Italy for graduate study and work translating Italian poetry at the University of Florence. That same year, Tagliabue received the first of seven Fulbright scholarships to teach, study, and translate Italian poetry at the University of Pisa. After teaching at the State College of Washington and Alfred University, Tagliabue came to Bates in 1953 where he taught in the English Department until his retirement in 1989. He is the author of six books of poetry.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Prof. Tagliabue discusses: his family background and early years; his experiences living in New York City and attending Columbia; meeting his wife Grace; interest in dance and theater; encouragement of teachers and development of his writing; experiences in Italy and Mario puppet plays; impressions of Bates and the local community; friends including Helene Hirshler; changes in curriculum including introduction of Asian literature; experiences in Japan; United Nations of Poetry; Poetry Reading Series at Bates; former students including Pamela Alexander; publication of first book.

 BCOH 069 Tagliabue, John circa 1989   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

John Tagliabue was born in Cantu, Italy on July 1, 1923 near Lake Como. At the age of four, Tagliabue immigrated with his mother and his younger sister to the United States following the emigration of his father and the establishment of his father's restaurant in North Bergen, New Jersey. An ardent enthusiast of literature and reading, John Tagliabue entered Columbia University where he majored in American, English, and Comparative Literature and took several courses in Art History. While at Columbia, Tagliabue was a student of renowned poet Mark Van Doren and studied alongside well known 1950s and 1960s writers and poets of the Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg.

Tagliabue graduated from Columbia University in 1944 with a B.A. degree in English and with a M.A. degree in 1945. Later that year, he left for his first teaching assignment at American University in Beirut, Lebanon. The following year, John Tagliabue married artist and painter, Grace Ten Eyck, who later illustrated many of his poems and created the puppets for his Mario Plays. In 1947, he traveled to Italy for graduate study and work translating Italian poetry at the University of Florence. That same year, Tagliabue received the first of seven Fulbright scholarships to teach, study, and translate Italian poetry at the University of Pisa. After teaching at the State College of Washington and Alfred University, Tagliabue came to Bates in 1953 where he taught in the English Department until his retirement in 1989.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers Tagliabue’s reflections on Thomas Hedley Reynolds presidency including his initiation and/or support of several programs such as dance, poetry series and the Asian Studies program; the building of Ladd Library and Olin Arts Center and his support of and rapport with the faculty; also describes and reads two poems he wrote for Reynolds—“To Dedicate a Library” and “Cheers for Captain Reynolds and Good Luck Wishes for Many Future Fortunate Voyages.”

General note

The interview was conducted by Anthony Nguyen ‘89 and Melissa Friedling ’91 to document the presidency of Thomas Hedley Reynolds. Footage was included in the documentary video, "The Reynolds Years,” produced by the students and supervised by Professor Robert Branham, on the occasion of Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 070 Tangney, Gina circa 1989   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Gina Tangney graduated with a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence and earned an M.A.T. degree from Harvard. Ms. Tangney was associate director of development for annual giving and assistant director of admissions at Sarah Lawrence before coming to Bates in 1976 as the Capital Campaign Coordinator. She became director of development in 1982 and vice president of development and alumni affairs in 1986.

Scope and Contents note

Interview covers how Tangney came to Bates; traveling with President Reynolds for the capital campaign; her relationship with Reynolds; accomplishments of the president including the cultivation of the faculty and enrichment of the curriculum, Ladd Library and Olin Arts Center and the purchase of property on the East end of Russell Street; school’s reputation and quality of education; and Reynolds’ character

General note

The interview was conducted by Anthony Nguyen ‘89 and Melissa Friedling ’91 to document the presidency of Thomas Hedley Reynolds. Footage was included in the documentary video, The Reynolds Years, produced by the students and supervised by Professor Robert Branham, on the occasion of Reynolds’ retirement.

 BCOH 122 Taylor, Eugene August 13, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Gene Taylor was born in Lewiston, Maine in 1934. He graduated from Monmouth Academy in 1952 and from Bates College in 1956. While at Bates he was active in student government and played varsity baseball and basketball. After graduation Mr. Taylor moved to Philadelphia, where he cofounded a private employment agency, Anderson-Taylor & Associates. He became president of the firm in 1969 and continued in that position until 1983, when he decided he needed a career change. As he had remained very active in Bates alumni affairs all through the years, he sought a position in the Development Office at Bates. In 1984, he was appointed Director of Planned Giving, and remained director until his retirement in June, 1998.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Taylor discusses: stories and anecdotes about Bates alumni he heard in the course of his work in planned giving; his student years including the Stanton Ride, mayoralty and involvement in student council; his involvement in alumni affairs; the endowment; and changes at the College since his student years.

 BCOH 123 Temple , Norman August 5, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Norman Temple was born in Brooklyn, NY on June 30, 1921 and raised in Rahway, NJ. After graduating from Rahway High School in 1940, Norm entered Bates College and stayed until joining the Army Air Corps in 1942 as a B-24 pilot. Discharged in October of 1945, he returned to Bates graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1947 with a degree in economics. In 1946 he was a member of the Bates debate team sent to Great Britain on a six-week tour of major universities in England and Scotland. After graduation Norm spent six years as the associate state secretary for the YMCA before joining the Maine Development Commission. In 1956 he joined Central Maine Power Company and was elected vice president in 1966. He retired in 1984. Norman has been active in Bates alumni affairs, especially raising money for the Alumni Fund.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Temple discusses: his background and decision to come to Bates; impressions of the College; various jobs he held while working his way through Bates including College news writer and photographer and living with and working for a local family; activities and social life including dances, Stanton Ride and chapel; Brooks Quimby and debate including the major role it played in his life; enlisting in the service; anecdotes about President Gray, Harry Rowe, Lloyd Fisher and other professors; anecdotes about local people he knew including Sam Bennett, Bill Davis, Johnny Robinson and Lionel Lemieux; his jobs after college; and involvement with alumni activities.

 BCOH 097 Tewhey, Mildred June 17, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Mildred Tewhey was born in 1923 in Auburn, Maine, but grew up in Lewiston. Upon graduation from Lewiston High School in 1941, she began working in the office of the Pepperill Manufacturing Company. After marrying in 1947, Mrs. Tewhey stayed home to raise her family. In 1966, she began working for Bates, first in the Registrar’s Office and then in the Development Office. She became secretary to James Carignan, Dean of the College, in 1973 and remained in that position until retiring in December of 1993.

Scope and Contents note

In the interview Mrs. Tewhey discusses: her experiences and duties in the Registrar’s Office; the Development Office, including her work on the Capital Campaign, and her experiences and responsibilities in the Dean’s Office including her relationship with Jim Carignan; inner workings of the office; serving as secretary to the Student Conduct Committee; the Dean Carignan shooting incident; Dukakis’ visit; working on the Secretaries of State Conference held at Bates; also discusses differences between President Phillips, President Reynolds and President Harward; changes in campus culture and student attitudes.

 BCOH 036 Thompson, Anne September 13, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Anne Booth Thompson was born on March 9, 1939 in Abbington, Pennsylvania. Her father was in the Air Force. Anne attended Radcliffe , then Cambridge University to pursue a degree in Anglo-Saxon and Celtic studies, and she received her Ph.D. in English at Harvard. She came to Bates in 1973, hired by Jim Hepburn in the English department, and in 1987 became the chair of the English department. Thompson has also taught classes in Classical and Medieval Studies and was instrumental in developing that department. Along with Ann Scott, Thompson was the only other woman on Senior Faculty for many years. She retired on August 31, 2005.

Scope and Contents note

Personal and family background; college and graduate work; coming to Bates; paternalistic tendencies of the college in the early 70s; working as a single mother; recollections of Jim Hepburn; interview for job at Bates; women faculty members; style comparisons of Bates presidents Reynolds, Harward and Hansen; retiring from Bates; changes in the student body.

 BCOH 098 Thumm, Garold W. July 16, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Garold Thumm was born in West Virginia on September 22, 1915, and spent most of his childhood in that state. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at Maurice Harvey College, now the University of Charleston, WV. He served in the army from 1941-45 and in 1946 entered graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania. His time at Penn was interrupted by a one year sabbatical in Europe, service in Washington during the Korean War and a stint on the faculty of the Naval War College. He remained at the University of Pennsylvania until coming to Bates in 1961 as professor of government and chairman of the Division of the Social Sciences. Professor Thumm served on many committees including the Library Committee, the Education Policy Committee, and the Advisory Committee. He retired in 1987.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Prof. Thumm discusses: his decision to come to Bates; courses he taught, including a Short Term in Luxembourg and his committee work including the building of Ladd Library, tenure issues, the Bates Plan, Cultural Heritage and the honors system. Other topics include the campus during the Vietnam era and interactions with President Charles Phillips and President Thomas Hedley Reynolds.

 BCOH 048 Tobin, Liz June 5, 2006   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Elizabeth (Howard) Tobin was born on February 13, 1951 in Normal, Illinois. She lived in Normal, Bloomington, Peoria, and finally Des Plains while growing up. She attended Swarthmore College and graduated in the class of 1973. She then traveled Europe for a year and worked as an Au Pair in Germany to learn German. She returned to the United States and began her graduate studies at Princeton in 1974. After working on her degree at Princeton for two years she went again to Germany in 1976 where she met Steve Hochstadt and lived in Dusseldorf for a year and a half doing research. She and Steve came to Bates in the fall of 1979. They were hired on a joint appointment as Modern European History professors. She completed her dissertation in the fall of 1984, was the first Director of the Women’s Studies Department in 1991, and became division chair and later associate dean of faculty. She left Bates to become Dean of Faculty at Illinois College.

Stephen Lawrance Hochstadt was born on August 30, 1948 in New York City. He grew up in Carle Place in Nassau County, Long Island. He attended Brown University and after graduating moved to a suburb of Washington D.C. where he worked as a computer programmer for a couple of years. He returned to Brown for graduate school in the fall of 1973. He went to Germany in the summer of 1974, and again in 1976, where he met Liz. In addition to teaching at Bates, for the past twenty years he has recorded oral histories of Jews who lived in Shanghai during WWII. He has also been very involved with student discipline at Bates. He left Bates to move to Illinois with Liz, where he writes and researches.

Scope and Contents note

Growing up and family background; Undergraduate and graduate education; Grandparents in Shanghai (Steve); Interviewing at Bates; Development of the Bates History Department; Details of a joint appointment; Forming the mandatory History Short Term course; First years at Bates; Divestment in companies who did business with South Africa; March 4th discussions—Sharon Kinsman; Student Conduct Committee; Leaving Bates; Presidents and presidential styles; The formation of the Women’s Studies Department; Oral history as a research method.

 BCOH 071 Wade Sr., Robert G.   1.0 vhs videocassette

Biographical note

Robert G. Wade Sr. was born on August 9, 1900 in Rockland, Massachusetts. After graduating from Rockland High School in 1918 he enlisted in the Student Army Training Corps at Bates College. After his discharge he entered Bates in 1919 and graduated in 1923. Bob married his Bates classmate, Nelly Milliken in 1926 and attended Harvard School of Business from 1927-1928. He has worked in the shoe business in Auburn, Maine and served as assistant manager of the Guild of Boston Artists. Bob began his investment career in Maine in 1944 as owner and president of Morton, Hall and Rounds. He retired from the investment business in 1986. Bob also served three terms in the Maine Legislature and has been active in Bates alumni affairs.

Scope and Contents note

Interview focuses on Robert Wade’s reflections about the College Chapel over his five years at Bates: arguments for going to chapel, reasons students were interested in going, and the minority who were not interested; music, speakers, Wade’s chapel-skipping technique; gender relations at chapel; also describes his wedding in the chapel.

General note

The interview was conducted for Robert Branham’s short term course Documentary Video Production and footage was included in the student produced documentary film The Secular Cathedral: Bates College Chapel.

 BCOH 124 Wade Sr., Robert G. July 14, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert G. Wade Sr. was born on August 9, 1900 in Rockland, Massachusetts. After graduating from Rockland High School in 1918 he enlisted in the Student Army Training Corps at Bates College. After his discharge he entered Bates in 1919 and graduated in 1923. Bob married his Bates classmate, Nelly Milliken in 1926 and attended Harvard School of Business from 1927-1928. He has worked in the shoe business in Auburn, Maine and served as assistant manager of the Guild of Boston Artists. Bob began his investment career in Maine in 1944 as owner and president of Morton, Hall and Rounds. He retired from the investment business in 1986. Bob also served three terms in the Maine Legislature and has been active in Bates alumni affairs.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Robert Wade discusses: his time in the SATC and decision to enter Bates; student life; college jobs and activities; anecdotes of Bates presidents and faculty including Brooks Quimby, Professor Gould, President Gray and President Reynolds; friendship with Norm Ross; relationship between Bates and the local community; minority students; jobs after college.

 BCOH 030 Wade Jr., Bob July 21, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Robert George Wade Jr. was born in Portland, Maine in 1927. Wade was the son of Nellie Milliken Wade and Robert Wade Sr., who, most visibly, worked in investment business. Robert Wade Jr. went into military service in 1945 and came out one year later. In 1946 Wade entered Bates College, where he had an enormous amount of connections through family members. Wade has served as a trustee for Bates for many years and was on the presidential search committee when Don Harward was eventually chosen as president.

Scope and Contents note

Family background; 5 generations of Bates connections; veterans at Bates; Air Force Officer in the Korean War; memorable professors at Bates; Harry Rowe; Sampsonville; Charles Sampson; Raymond Zerby; Hedley Reynolds; Don Haward; experiences as a Trustee.

 BCOH 136 Wagner, Richard and Lois May 9, 2011   1.0 digital recording(s)

Biographical note

Richard Wagner was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1935. He graduated from Haverford College and earned his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He studied for a year in Santiago, Chile on a Fulbright Scholarship and then taught for six years at Bucknell University. Dr. Wagner came to Bates in 1970 to teach in the psychology department. He was the department chair for 25 years and retired in 2004.

Lois Wagner was born in Hancock, Michigan in 1935. She grew up in Alpena and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. Lois attended the Michigan College of Mining and Technology and the University of Michigan. She also did graduate work in the library sciences. After she and Richard moved to Maine, Lois became active in the League of Women Voters and worked part time at the Lewiston Public Library. In 1980 she became a full-time reference librarian at the Auburn Public Library and remained there until 1996.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Richard and Lois Wagner discuss: family background; the College in the early 1970’s; hiring practices; growth of the psychology department; growth of the faculty and the physical campus under President Reynolds and Carl Straub; women faculty; Needle Club; changes in student body; relationship between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community.

 BCOH 038 Walter, Kirsten September 27, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Kirsten Andrea Walter was born in Stanford, California in February of 1978. She grew up in California and spent some of her childhood in Post Mills, Vermont. She graduated from Bates in 2000. Walter got interested in Political Science classes at Bates, and her thesis advisor was Bill Corlett. For her first two years at Bates, Walter was on the crew team. She was also involved in such clubs as the Environmental Coalition, the Outing Club, and the New World Coalition. Currently, Walter is involved in Hilltop Community Gardens and Lots to Gardens, two organizations that she started. She now lives in Greene, Maine, and continues to be involved with Bates.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; going to Boston University; transferring to Bates; first impressions of Bates; memorable classes and professors; organizations and events that Walter was involved in; chalking incident on the quad; Lots to Gardens; memorable events at Bates.

 BCOH 125 Walther, Theodore July 3, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Theodore Walther was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1929 and raised in New York City. He served as an airman in the U.S. Navy from 1948-1952. After his discharge he attended New York University and then went to Mexico City College where he received his A.B. in 1955. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D from the New School for Social Research. Walther came to Bates in 1958 as an instructor in economics and retired in 1998.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Professor Walther discusses: his educational background; growth and changes in the economics department including course offerings; changes in student life; short term; chapel; changes in the student body/diversity; involvement with the Athletic Committee.

 BCOH 126 Weston, James August 5, 1998   2.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

James Weston was born in Augusta, Maine and graduated from Gould Academy. He earned a degree in marketing from Nichols College and worked at Depositor’s Trust Company before coming to Bates as assistant business manager in 1970. At the time of his retirement in 1994 he was Vice President of Business Affairs.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Jim Weston discusses: his background and how he came to Bates; job duties including purchasing and bill collecting; automation; changes in work environment; Lake Andrews project; College’s use of employees vs outside third parties for services such as food service, security and maintenance; campus wide telephone project; anecdotes about several campus incidents including the fire at the president’s house; relationship with and anecdotes about President Reynolds, President Harward and Jim Carignan

 BCOH 135 Wigton, George July 1, 1999   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

George Wigton was born in 1929 in Oberlin, Ohio. After high school he started at Ohio State University and then left to enter the service. Four years later he returned and graduated in 1956. While at Ohio State he was on the varsity basketball and track teams and was an All-Ohio basketball player. He was also all-conference in the Cleveland Southwestern Conference in basketball, football and track. Mr. Wigton spent nine years at the University of Connecticut as an assistant in track, football and basketball before coming to Bates in 1965 as head coach of men’s soccer, men’s tennis and men’s basketball. During his 31 years at Bates, he was the longest serving coach of men’s basketball (20 years) and at 26 years, the longest serving coach of men’s tennis. He was also instrumental in bringing squash to Bates and served as head coach for men’s and women’s squash. Coach Wigton served as Assistant Director of Athletics from 1974-1984 and retired in 1996.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Coach Wigton discusses: his decision to come to Bates; condition of programs and facilities when he arrived; administrative/financial support for athletic programs; women’s athletics and Title IX; recruitment; his administrative and teaching responsibilities; coaching methods; outstanding athletes and teams; relationship with other coaches and faculty and between Bates and the Lewiston-Auburn community; reflections on the presidencies of Charles Phillips, Thomas Hedley Reynolds and Donald Harward.

 BCOH 139 Williams, Anne May 12, 2011   1.0 digital recording(s)

Biographical note

Anne Williams was born on October 24, 1943 in Montreal, Canada. She grew up in Arlington, Virginia and graduated from the St. Agnes School in Alexandria, Virginia. After graduating from Smith College in 1965, Anne joined the Peace Corps and served in India for 2 years as part of the Family Planning Program. Upon her return she worked as a research assistant at the Brookings Institute and for the Federal Reserve Board. In 1976, while teaching in the Economics Department at the University of Pennsylvania, Anne earned her Ph.D from the University of Chicago. While on a leave from the University of Pennsylvania, she served as Research Director of the Select Committee on Population for the U.S. House of Representatives. Anne came to Bates in 1981 as chairman of the Economics Department. She is also recognized as the leading historian and collector of antique jigsaw puzzles and wrote The Jigsaw Puzzle: Piecing Together a History. Anne retired in 2008.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Anne Williams discusses: her educational background and experiences as an undergraduate and graduate student; teaching experiences at University of Pennsylvania; coming to Bates including the hiring process, state of the economics department and responsibilities as chairman; expectations of female faculty; impressions of President Reynolds and President Harward; expansion of facilities and curriculum; changes in expectations of faculty; makeup and size of faculty and student body and growth of college bureaucracy; jigsaw puzzles.

 BCOH 127 Wilson, Ruth Rowe July 22, 1998   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Ruth Rowe Wilson was born June 6, 1914 in Waterville, Maine. Her father was Bates Dean Harry Rowe, class of 1912. Ruth grew up in Lewiston and graduated from Bates College in 1936 with a degree in sociology. She married Val H. Wilson, a 1938 Bates graduate, who became president of Skidmore College in 1957. After his death in 1964 she returned to Lewiston to work for Bates as the editor of its magazine and college publications, a position she held until 1980. She currently serves as class notes editor. In 1986 Ruth received the Bates Alumni Association’s Distinguished Service Award. She has also hosted annual picnics for the college’s international students at her summer home at Ocean Park.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mrs. Wilson discusses: reminiscences and anecdotes of her father, Harry Rowe; growing up near the campus and interactions with faculty and their families; her college years including living at home, relationship between on campus students and town students, minorities and chapel; work as YWCA secretary in Ohio; moving back to Maine; her job as editor of college publications; changes in campus culture and student opportunities; reflections of President Phillips, President Reynolds and President Harward; relationship between Bates and local community.

 BCOH 128 Wood, Walter June 30, 1997   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Walter Woods is a Maine native and Sabattus resident. He began working for a construction firm in 1952 that was involved with many of the major projects on the Bates College campus. In 1980 Woods came to Bates as director of the Maintenance Department. He retired in 1997.

Scope and Contents note

In this interview Mr. Woods discusses: his responsibilities as director of the maintenance department; departmental growth; renovation projects; changes in departmental policies; campus improvements including hiring horticulturist, flower beds and parking lots; dorm damage; handicap accessibility; campus wide phone system; growth and maintenance of rental properties; walkways; prioritizing projects and utilizing staff; relationship with President Reynolds and President Harward; winter maintenance challenges; renovation of President’s house after fire.

 BCOH 020 York, Darcy May 16, 2005   1.0 audiocassette(s)

Biographical note

Darcy Lynn York was born on December 24, 1982 in Brunswick, Maine, to Ronald and Roxanne York. She grew up on Bailey Island, a small island off the coast of Brunswick. Her father is/was the mailman on the island, and her mother is/was a hairdresser. Darcy is a member of the Bates class of 2005. She came to Bates thinking she would be a theatre major, but ended up majoring in history. On campus she has been involved with the Outing club, the Frisbee team, and has been very involved with WRBC, the Bates College radio station. Darcy has traveled abroad to such places as England, France, and Ecuador during her four years at Bates. She has also recently been in charge of a photographic history project of Bates called “Bates Greats”, which is currently featured both on the college’s web site, as well as displayed in Ladd library.

Scope and Contents note

Personal background; Coming to Bates; Student reactions to 9/11; Influential classes and professors; Bates Greats project; Studying abroad in BCC program; Important campus social events; Lickit; Involvement with WRBC; WRBC trivia night.